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Frontiers of Structural and Civil Engineering

, Volume 13, Issue 1, pp 240–249 | Cite as

Hydromechanical model for hydraulic fractures using XFEM

Research Article
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Abstract

In this study, a hydromechanical model for fluid flow in fractured porous media is presented. We assume viscous fluids and the coupling equations are derived from the mass and momentum balance equations for saturated porous media. The fluid flow through discrete cracks will be modelled by the extended finite element method and an implicit time integration scheme. We also present a consistent linearization of the underlying non-linear discrete equations. They are solved by the Newton-Raphson iteration procedure in combination with a line search. Furthermore, the model is extended to includes crack propagation. Finally, examples are presented to demonstrate the versatility and efficiency of this two-scale hydromechanical model. The results suggest that the presence of the fracture in a deforming, porous media has great impact on the fluid flow and deformation patterns.

Keywords

multi-phase medium porous fracture multi-scale method 

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Copyright information

© Higher Education Press and Springer-Verlag GmbH Germany, part of Springer Nature 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Faculty of Mechanical EngineeringLeibniz University of HanoverHannoverGermany

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