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Modeling of shear walls using finite shear connector elements based on continuum plasticity

  • Ulf Arne Girhammar
  • Per Johan Gustafsson
  • Bo Källsner
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Abstract

Light-frame timber buildings are often stabilized against lateral loads by using diaphragm action of roofs, floors and walls. The mechanical behavior of the sheathing-to-framing joints has a significant impact on the structural performance of shear walls. Most sheathing-to-framing joints show nonlinear load-displacement characteristics with plastic behavior. This paper is focused on the finite element modeling of shear walls. The purpose is to present a new shear connector element based on the theory of continuum plasticity. The incremental load-displacement relationship is derived based on the elastic-plastic stiffness tensor including the elastic stiffness tensor, the plastic modulus, a function representing the yield criterion and a hardening rule, and function representing the plastic potential. The plastic properties are determined from experimental results obtained from testing actual connections. Load-displacement curves for shear walls are calculated using the shear connector model and they are compared with experimental and other computational results. Also, the ultimate horizontal load-carrying capacity is compared to results obtained by an analytical plastic design method. Good agreements are found.

Keywords

shear walls wall diaphragms finite element modelling plastic shear connector analytical modelling experimental comparison 

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Notes

Acknowledgements

The authors would like to give their sincere thanks for the financial support from the County Administrative Board in Norrbotten, the Regional Council of Västerbotten, and the European Union: European Regional Development Fund – Regional Structural Fund and Interregional Programmes.

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Copyright information

© Higher Education Press and Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2016

Authors and Affiliations

  • Ulf Arne Girhammar
    • 1
  • Per Johan Gustafsson
    • 2
  • Bo Källsner
    • 3
  1. 1.Division of Wood Science and EngineeringLuleå University of TechnologySkellefteåSweden
  2. 2.Division of Structural MechanicsDepartment of Building Sciences, Lund UniversityLundSweden
  3. 3.Department of Building TechnologyLinnæus UniversityVäxjöSweden

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