Modeling of alkali-silica reaction in concrete: a review

  • J. W. Pan
  • Y. T. Feng
  • J. T. Wang
  • Q. C. Sun
  • C. H. Zhang
  • D. R. J. Owen
Review
  • 951 Downloads

Abstract

This paper presents a comprehensive review of modeling of alkali-silica reaction (ASR) in concrete. Such modeling is essential for investigating the chemical expansion mechanism and the subsequent influence on the mechanical aspects of the material. The concept of ASR and the mechanism of expansion are first outlined, and the state-of-the-art of modeling for ASR, the focus of the paper, is then presented in detail. The modeling includes theoretical approaches, meso- and macroscopic models for ASR analysis. The theoretical approaches dealt with the chemical reaction mechanism and were used for predicting pessimum size of aggregate. Mesoscopic models have attempted to explain the mechanism of mechanical deterioration of ASR-affected concrete at material scale. The macroscopic models, chemomechanical coupling models, have been generally developed by combining the chemical reaction kinetics with linear or nonlinear mechanical constitutive, and were applied to reproduce and predict the long-term behavior of structures suffering from ASR. Finally, a conclusion and discussion of the modeling are given.

Keywords

alkali-silica reaction (ASR) modeling concrete mesoscopic macroscopic 

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Copyright information

© Higher Education Press and Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2012

Authors and Affiliations

  • J. W. Pan
    • 1
    • 2
  • Y. T. Feng
    • 2
  • J. T. Wang
    • 1
  • Q. C. Sun
    • 1
  • C. H. Zhang
    • 1
  • D. R. J. Owen
    • 2
  1. 1.State Key Laboratory of Hydroscience and EngineeringTsinghua UniversityBeijingChina
  2. 2.Civil and Computational Engineering Research Centre, College of EngineeringSwansea UniversitySwanseaUK

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