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Frontiers of Materials Science

, Volume 9, Issue 2, pp 147–150 | Cite as

Synthesis, crystal structure and thermal analysis of a new stilbazolium salt crystal

  • Bing Teng
  • Weijin Kong
  • Ke Feng
  • Fei You
  • Lifeng Cao
  • Degao Zhong
  • Lun Hao
  • Qing Sun
  • Sander van Smaalen
  • Wenhui Gong
Research Article

Abstract

A new organic crystal of 4-N, N-dimethylamino-4′-N′-methyl-stilbazolium benzene sulfonate (DASBS) was synthesized and characterized for the first time. It is a derivative of 4-N, N-dimethylamino-4′-N′-methyl-stilbazolium tosylate (DAST) with the benzene sulfonate replacing p-toluenesulfonate. Single crystal XRD demonstrated that the crystal structure of DASBS·H2O was triclinic. The thermal analysis of this new crystal was also conducted, and the melting point was obtained to be 232°C.

Keywords

organic crystal crystal growth single crystal X-ray diffraction thermal analysis 

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Copyright information

© Higher Education Press and Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2015

Authors and Affiliations

  • Bing Teng
    • 1
    • 2
  • Weijin Kong
    • 1
    • 2
  • Ke Feng
    • 1
    • 2
  • Fei You
    • 1
    • 2
  • Lifeng Cao
    • 1
    • 2
  • Degao Zhong
    • 1
    • 2
  • Lun Hao
    • 1
    • 2
  • Qing Sun
    • 1
    • 2
  • Sander van Smaalen
    • 3
  • Wenhui Gong
    • 1
    • 2
  1. 1.College of PhysicsQingdao UniversityQingdaoChina
  2. 2.Key Laboratory of Photonics Materials and Technology in Universities of ShandongQingdaoChina
  3. 3.Laboratory of CrystallographyUniversity of BayreuthBayreuthGermany

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