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Gastric Lipohyperplasia Presenting as Gastric Polyposis: the First Case Report and Morphometric Study of Additional 127 Bariatric Specimens with a Proposal for Diagnostic Criteria

  • Vaibhav Chumbalkar
  • Zhiyan Fu
  • Ann Boguniewicz
  • Tejinder P. Singh
  • Hwajeong LeeEmail author
Original Contributions
  • 13 Downloads

Abstract

Introduction

Excessive fat accumulation in the gastrointestinal tract is pathologic. Gastric mucosal polyposis due to excessive submucosal fat infiltration in a bariatric partial gastrectomy specimen was encountered, which has not been described in the literature. This observation prompted us to assess the extent of fat in gastric submucosa and study the incidence of mucosal polyposis due to submucosal fat accumulation in morbidly obese patients.

Materials and Methods

Archived pathology slides of 128 bariatric partial gastrectomy specimens including the index case and 89 control cases obtained from Whipple’s procedure were examined. The amount of submucosal fat was categorized as 0 (no fat), 1 (up to 70% fat), and 2 (> 70% fat). The maximum submucosal fat thickness was measured with the interval cutoff of 5 mm and 10 mm.

Results

Of the 128 cases, 90 (70.3%) were category 1 and 31 (24.2%) were category 2. Maximum submucosal fat thickness was > 10 mm in 3 (2.3%) cases including the index case. The extent of submucosal fat accumulation correlated with the body mass index. The frequencies of category 2 and > 10 mm of fat thickness were higher in the bariatric patient group compared with the control group.

Conclusion

We propose a submucosal fat thickness of > 10 mm and diffuse (> 70%) fat accumulation as diagnostic criteria for gastric lipohyperplasia. Using these criteria, the prevalence of gastric lipohyperplasia in the morbidly obese population is 2.3%. A subset of these may present as gastric mucosal polyps.

Keywords

Obesity Bariatric Lipomatosis Lipohyperplasia Polyposis 

Notes

Compliance with Ethical Standards

Conflict of Interest

The authors declare that they have no conflict of interest.

Ethical Statement

-The manuscript has not been submitted to more than one journal for simultaneous consideration.

-No data, text, theories by others are presented as if they were the authors’ own.

-Consent to submit has been received from all co-authors and responsible authorities at the institute/organization where the work has been carried out before the work is submitted.

-Authors whose names appear on the submission have contributed sufficiently to the scientific work and therefore share collective responsibility and accountability for the results.

Human/Animal Rights Statement

Not applicable. The study was approved by an institutional review board.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC, part of Springer Nature 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of Pathology and Laboratory MedicineAlbany Medical CenterAlbanyUSA
  2. 2.Department of Surgery, Minimally Invasive and Bariatric SurgeryAlbany Medical CenterAlbanyUSA

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