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Obesity Surgery

, Volume 29, Issue 2, pp 640–641 | Cite as

Reply to “Crashing NASH in Patients Listed for Bariatric Surgery”

  • Geraldine J. OoiEmail author
  • Paul R. Burton
  • William W. Kemp
  • Stuart K. Roberts
  • Wendy A. Brown
Letter to Editor/LED Reply
  • 39 Downloads

Notes

Compliance with Ethical Standards

Disclosures

Geraldine Ooi, Paul Burton, and Wendy Brown report being affiliated with The Centre for Obesity Research and Education. The center has received funding for research purposes from Allergan and Apollo Endosurgery, the manufacturers of the LapBand™. The grant is not tied to any specific research project, and neither Allergan nor Apollo Endosurgery have control of the protocol, analysis, and reporting of any studies. The center also receives a grant from Applied Medical towards educational programs.

Wendy Brown reports financial support for a bariatric surgery registry from the Commonwealth of Australia, Apollo Endosurgery, Covidien, Johnson and Johnson, Gore and Applied Medical. Since initial submission of this paper, she has also received a speaker’s honorarium from Merck Sharpe and Dohme and a speaker’s honorarium and fees from participation in a scientific advisory board from Novo Nordisk. The bariatric registry and the honorariums are outside of the submitted work.

Geraldine Ooi reports scholarships from the National Health and Medical Research Council and the Royal Australasian College of Surgeons.

The remaining authors have no other disclosures or conflicts of interest.

[Authors] report being affiliated with [Affiliation]. [Affiliation] has received funding for research purposes from Allergan and Apollo Endosurgery, the manufacturers of the LapBand™. The grant is not tied to any specific research project, and neither Allergan nor Apollo Endosurgery have control of the protocol, analysis and reporting of any studies. [Affiliation] also receives a grant from Applied Medical towards educational programs.

[Author] reports financial support for a bariatric surgery registry from the Commonwealth of Australia, Apollo Endosurgery, Covidien, Johnson and Johnson, Gore and Applied Medical. Since initial submission of this paper, they have also received a speaker’s honorarium from Merck Sharpe and Dohme and a speaker’s honorarium and fees from participation in a scientific advisory board from Novo Nordisk. The bariatric registry and the honorariums are outside of the submitted work.

[Author] reports scholarships from the National Health and Medical Research Council and the Royal Australasian College of Surgeons.

The remaining authors have no other disclosures or conflicts of interest.

References

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC, part of Springer Nature 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Centre for Obesity Research and Education, Central Clinical SchoolMonash UniversityMelbourneAustralia
  2. 2.Department of General SurgeryThe Alfred HospitalMelbourneAustralia
  3. 3.Department of HepatologyThe Alfred HospitalMelbourneAustralia

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