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Obesity Surgery

, Volume 20, Issue 2, pp 257–260 | Cite as

Chyloperitoneum After Laparoscopic Roux-en-Y Gastric Bypass (LRYGB)

  • Jesús E. Hidalgo
  • Alexander Ramirez
  • Sheetal Patel
  • Emeka Acholonu
  • Jeremy Eckstein
  • Wasef Abu-Jaish
  • Samuel Szomstein
  • Raul J. RosenthalEmail author
Case Report

Abstract

A true chylous effusion is defined as the presence of ascitic fluid with high fat (triglyceride) content, usually higher than 110 mg/dl. We report a case of chyloperitoneum following laparoscopic Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (LRYGB) in a 40-year-old patient who was admitted for surgery on May 31, 2007. On August 2008 an abdominal CT with contrast was ordered for chronic abdominal pain showing diffuse ascites as well as mesenteric adenitis. On September 2008, the patient was admitted to the hospital. An elective diagnostic laparoscopy was scheduled. A large amount of chylous fluid was found. Microscopic analysis came back negative. The patient made an uneventful recovery after surgery. To our knowledge, this is the first reported case of chylous ascites following LRYGB. Chyloperitoneum should be considered as a possible cause of ascites in patients with chronic small bowel obstruction following a LRYGB.

Keywords

Chyloperitoneum Obesity Bariatric surgery Laparoscopic Roux-en-Y gastric bypass 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science + Business Media, LLC 2009

Authors and Affiliations

  • Jesús E. Hidalgo
    • 1
  • Alexander Ramirez
    • 1
  • Sheetal Patel
    • 1
  • Emeka Acholonu
    • 1
  • Jeremy Eckstein
    • 1
  • Wasef Abu-Jaish
    • 1
  • Samuel Szomstein
    • 1
  • Raul J. Rosenthal
    • 1
    Email author
  1. 1.Section of Minimally Invasive SurgeryThe Bariatric and Metabolic Institute Cleveland Clinic FloridaWestonUSA

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