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Frontiers of Medicine

, Volume 13, Issue 1, pp 121–125 | Cite as

Effect of antitubercular treatment on the pregnancy outcomes and prognoses of patients with genital tuberculosis

  • Jing Yue
  • Bo Zhang
  • Mingyue Wang
  • Junning Yao
  • Yifan Zhou
  • Ding Ma
  • Lei JinEmail author
Letter to Frontiers of Medicine
  • 12 Downloads

Abstract

This retrospective study aims to demonstrate the effect of antitubercular treatment (ATT) on the pregnancy outcomes and prognoses of patients with genital tuberculosis (GTB) who had received laparoscopy and/or hysteroscopy. This study included 78 patients with infertility and who were diagnosed with GTB through laparoscopy and/or hysteroscopy over the period of November 2005 to October 2015. The recruited patients were divided into ATT and nonATT groups on the basis of ATT duration. The GTB recurrence rates, menstrual patterns, and pregnancy outcomes of the patients were determined at follow-up. Among the 78 patients, 46 received ATT and 32 did not receive ATT. The menstrual volumes of patients in the ATT group significantly decreased relative to those of patients in the nonATT group. GTB did not recur among all patients regardless of treatment. A total of 11 pregnancies (36.7%) in the ATT group and 19 pregnancies (63.3%) in the nonATT group were observed. Pregnancy rates significantly differed (P = 0.002) between the two groups. ATT may decrease the menstrual volume and pregnancy rates of patients who were diagnosed with GTB through laparoscopy and/or hysteroscopy. In addition, ATT did not improve the prognosis of patients with chronic GTB.

Keywords

antitubercular treatment pregnancy prognosis genital tuberculosis 

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Copyright information

© Higher Education Press and Springer-Verlag GmbH Germany, part of Springer Nature 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • Jing Yue
    • 1
  • Bo Zhang
    • 1
  • Mingyue Wang
    • 1
  • Junning Yao
    • 1
  • Yifan Zhou
    • 1
  • Ding Ma
    • 2
  • Lei Jin
    • 1
    Email author
  1. 1.Reproductive Medicine Center, Tongji Hospital, Tongji Medical CollegeHuazhong University of Science and TechnologyWuhanChina
  2. 2.Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics, Tongji Hospital, Tongji Medical CollegeHuazhong University of Science and TechnologyWuhanChina

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