Advertisement

White blood cell count and the incidence of hyperuricemia: insights from a community-based study

  • Jian Liu
  • Pingyan Shen
  • Xiaobo Ma
  • Xialian Yu
  • Liyan Ni
  • Xu Hao
  • Weiming WangEmail author
  • Nan Chen
Letter to Frontiers of Medicine
  • 18 Downloads

Abstract

Hyperuricemia (HUA) is a risk factor for chronic kidney disease (CKD). The relationship between HUA and white blood cell (WBC) count remains unknown. A sampling survey for CKD was conducted in Sanlin community in 2012 and 2014. CKD was defined as proteinuria in at least the microalbuminuric stage or an estimated GFR of 60 mL/(min∙1.73 m2). HUA was defined as serum uric acid > 420 μmol/L in men and > 360 μmol/L in women. This study included 1024 participants. The prevalence of HUAwas 17.77%. Patients with HUA were more likely to have higher levels of WBC count, which was positively associated with HUA prevalence. This association was also observed in participants without CKD, diabetes mellitus, hyperlipidemia, or obesity. Multivariate logistic regression analysis showed that WBC count was independently associated with the risk for HUA in male and female participants. Compared with participants without HUA, inflammatory factors such as high-sensitivity C-reactive protein, tumor necrosis factor-α, and interleukin 6 increased in participants with HUA. Hence, WBC count is positively associated with HUA, and this association is independent of conventional risk factors for CKD.

Keywords

white blood cell count hyperuricemia chronic kidney disease inflammation 

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Notes

Acknowledgements

This study was supported by the National Project for the Construction of Clinical Key Specialty, Project of Special Fund for Health-Scientific Research (No. 201002010), National Key Research and Development Program of China (No. 2016YFC 1305402), National Key Technology R&D Program (No. 2011BAI10B00), Experimental Animal Project of Shanghai Science and Technology Committee (No. 15140902800), Key Projects of National Basic Research Program of China (973 Program, Nos. 2012CB517700 and 2012CB517604), National Natural Science Foundation of China (Nos. 81700647, 81270782, and 30771000), and Key Discipline Construction Projects approved by the Health Development Planning Commission of Shanghai.

References

  1. 1.
    Chen N, Wang W, Huang Y, Shen P, Pei D, Yu H, Shi H, Zhang Q, Xu J, Lv Y, Fan Q. Community-based study on CKD subjects and the associated risk factors. Nephrol Dial Transplant 2009; 24(7): 2117–2123CrossRefPubMedPubMedCentralGoogle Scholar
  2. 2.
    Zhang L, Wang F, Wang L, Wang W, Liu B, Liu J, Chen M, He Q, Liao Y, Yu X, Chen N, Zhang JE, Hu Z, Liu F, Hong D, Ma L, Liu H, Zhou X, Chen J, Pan L, Chen W, Wang W, Li X, Wang H. Prevalence of chronic kidney disease in China: a cross-sectional survey. Lancet 2012; 379(9818): 815–822CrossRefPubMedGoogle Scholar
  3. 3.
    Jalal DI, Chonchol M, Chen W, Targher G. Uric acid as a target of therapy in CKD. Am J Kidney Dis 2013; 61(1): 134–146CrossRefPubMedGoogle Scholar
  4. 4.
    Chu NF, Wang DJ, Liou SH, Shieh SM. Relationship between hyperuricemia and other cardiovascular disease risk factors among adult males in Taiwan. Eur J Epidemiol 2000; 16(1): 13–17CrossRefPubMedGoogle Scholar
  5. 5.
    Han HJ, Lim MJ, Lee YJ, Lee JH, Yang IS, Taub M. Uric acid inhibits renal proximal tubule cell proliferation via at least two signaling pathways involving PKC, MAPK, cPLA2, and NF-κB. Am J Physiol Renal Physiol 2007; 292(1): F373–F381CrossRefPubMedGoogle Scholar
  6. 6.
    Roncal CA, Mu W, Croker B, Reungjui S, Ouyang X, Tabah-Fisch I, Johnson RJ, Ejaz AA. Effect of elevated serum uric acid on cisplatin-induced acute renal failure. Am J Physiol Renal Physiol 2007; 292(1): F116–F122CrossRefPubMedGoogle Scholar
  7. 7.
    Kang DH, Nakagawa T, Feng L, Watanabe S, Han L, Mazzali M, Truong L, Harris R, Johnson RJ. A role for uric acid in the progression of renal disease. J Am Soc Nephrol 2002; 13(12): 2888–2897CrossRefPubMedGoogle Scholar
  8. 8.
    Gür M, Sahin DY, Elbasan Z, Kalkan GY, Yıldız A, Kaya Z, Özaltun B, Çaylı M. Uric acid and high sensitive C-reactive protein are associated with subclinical thoracic aortic atherosclerosis. J Cardiol 2013; 61(2): 144–148CrossRefPubMedGoogle Scholar
  9. 9.
    Su P, Hong L, Zhao Y, Sun H, Li L. Relationship between hyperuricemia and cardiovascular disease risk factors in a Chinese population: a cross-sectional study. Med Sci Monit 2015; 21: 2707–2717CrossRefPubMedPubMedCentralGoogle Scholar
  10. 10.
    Kang YH, Min HG, Kim IJ, Kim YK, Son SM. Comparison of alanine aminotransferase, white blood cell count, and uric acid in their association with metabolic syndrome: a study of Korean adults. Endocr J 2008; 55(6): 1093–1102CrossRefPubMedGoogle Scholar
  11. 11.
    Zhu A, Zou T, Xiong G, Zhang J. Association of uric acid with traditional inflammatory factors in stroke. Int J Neurosci 2016; 126 (4): 335–341CrossRefPubMedGoogle Scholar
  12. 12.
    Levey AS, Bosch JP, Lewis JB, Greene T, Rogers N, Roth D. A more accurate method to estimate glomerular filtration rate from serum creatinine: a new prediction equation. Ann Intern Med 1999; 130(6): 461–470CrossRefPubMedGoogle Scholar
  13. 13.
    Fang J, Alderman MH. Serum uric acid and cardiovascular mortality. The NHANES I Epidemiologic Follow-up Study, 1971–1992. JAMA 2000; 283(18): 2404–2410CrossRefPubMedPubMedCentralGoogle Scholar
  14. 14.
    Chobanian AV, Bakris GL, Black HR, Cushman WC, Green LA, Izzo JL Jr, Jones DW, Materson BJ, Oparil S, Wright JT Jr, Roccella EJ; National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute Joint National Committee on Prevention, Detection, Evaluation, and Treatment of High Blood Pressure; National High Blood Pressure Education Program Coordinating Committee. The Seventh Report of the Joint National Committee on Prevention, Detection, Evaluation, and Treatment of High Blood Pressure: the JNC 7 report. JAMA 2003; 289(19): 2560–2572CrossRefPubMedGoogle Scholar
  15. 15.
    Kocaman SA, Sahinarslan A, Cemri M, Timurkaynak T, Boyaci B, Cengel A. Independent relationship of serum uric acid levels with leukocytes and coronary atherosclerotic burden. Nutr Metab Cardiovasc Dis 2009; 19(10): 729–735CrossRefPubMedGoogle Scholar
  16. 16.
    Su P, Hong L, Zhao Y, Sun H, Li L. The association between hyperuricemia and hematological indicators in a Chinese adult population. Medicine (Baltimore) 2016; 95(7): e2822CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  17. 17.
    Li PF, Chen JS, Chang JB, Chang HW, Wu CZ, Chuang TJ, Huang CL, Pei D, Hsieh CH, Chen YL. Association of complete blood cell counts with metabolic syndrome in an elderly population. BMC Geriatr 2016; 16(1): 10CrossRefPubMedPubMedCentralGoogle Scholar
  18. 18.
    Nakanishi N, Sato M, Shirai K, Nakajima K, Murakami S, Takatorige T, Suzuki K, Tatara K. Associations between white blood cell count and features of the metabolic syndrome in Japanese male office workers. Ind Health 2002; 40(3): 273–277CrossRefPubMedGoogle Scholar
  19. 19.
    Lee YJ, Lee JW, Kim JK, Lee JH, Kim JH, Kwon KY, Lee HR, Lee DC, Shim JY. Elevated white blood cell count is associated with arterial stiffness. Nutr Metab Cardiovasc Dis 2009; 19(1): 3–7CrossRefPubMedGoogle Scholar
  20. 20.
    Di Bonito P, Sanguigno E, Forziato C, Saitta F, Iardino MR, Capaldo B. Fasting plasma glucose and clustering of cardiometabolic risk factors in normoglycemic outpatient children and adolescents. Diabetes Care 2011; 34(6): 1412–1414CrossRefPubMedPubMedCentralGoogle Scholar
  21. 21.
    Nakanishi N, Yoshida H, Matsuo Y, Suzuki K, Tatara K. White blood-cell count and the risk of impaired fasting glucose or Type II diabetes in middle-aged Japanese men. Diabetologia 2002; 45(1): 42–48CrossRefPubMedGoogle Scholar
  22. 22.
    Gillum RF, Mussolino ME. White blood cell count and hypertension incidence. The NHANES I Epidemiologic Follow-up Study. J Clin Epidemiol 1994; 47(8): 911–919CrossRefPubMedGoogle Scholar
  23. 23.
    Eder L, Thavaneswaran A, Chandran V, Cook R, Gladman DD. Increased burden of inflammation over time is associated with the extent of atherosclerotic plaques in patients with psoriatic arthritis. Ann Rheum Dis 2015; 74(10): 1830–1835CrossRefPubMedGoogle Scholar
  24. 24.
    Ames BN, Cathcart R, Schwiers E, Hochstein P. Uric acid provides an antioxidant defense in humans against oxidant- and radicalcaused aging and cancer: a hypothesis. Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 1981; 78(11): 6858–6862CrossRefPubMedPubMedCentralGoogle Scholar
  25. 25.
    Netea MG, Kullberg BJ, Blok WL, Netea RT, van der Meer JW. The role of hyperuricemia in the increased cytokine production after lipopolysaccharide challenge in neutropenic mice. Blood 1997; 89 (2): 577–582PubMedGoogle Scholar
  26. 26.
    Ruggiero C, Cherubini A, Ble A, Bos AJG, Maggio M, Dixit VD, Lauretani F, Bandinelli S, Senin U, Ferrucci L. Uric acid and inflammatory markers. Eur Heart J 2006; 27(10): 1174–1181CrossRefPubMedPubMedCentralGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Higher Education Press and Springer-Verlag GmbH Germany, part of Springer Nature 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • Jian Liu
    • 1
    • 2
  • Pingyan Shen
    • 1
    • 2
  • Xiaobo Ma
    • 1
    • 2
  • Xialian Yu
    • 1
    • 2
  • Liyan Ni
    • 1
    • 2
  • Xu Hao
    • 1
    • 2
  • Weiming Wang
    • 1
    • 2
    Email author
  • Nan Chen
    • 1
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of NephrologyRuijin Hospital Affiliated to Shanghai Jiao Tong University School of MedicineShanghaiChina
  2. 2.Institute of NephrologyShanghai Jiao Tong University School of MedicineShanghaiChina

Personalised recommendations