Brain Imaging and Behavior

, Volume 6, Issue 1, pp 70–76

Antidepressant effects of magnetic resonance imaging—based stimulation on major depressive disorder: a double-blind randomized clinical trial

  • Seyed Mehran Vaziri-Bozorg
  • Ahmad Reza Ghasemi-Esfe
  • Omid Khalilzadeh
  • Houman Sotoudeh
  • Hadi Rokni-Yazdi
  • Hossein Ghanaati
  • Kavous Firouznia
  • Vandad Sharifi
  • Maryam Tabatabayee
  • Soheil Kooraki
  • Madjid Shakiba
Original Research

DOI: 10.1007/s11682-011-9143-2

Cite this article as:
Vaziri-Bozorg, S.M., Ghasemi-Esfe, A.R., Khalilzadeh, O. et al. Brain Imaging and Behavior (2012) 6: 70. doi:10.1007/s11682-011-9143-2

Abstract

Antidepressant effects of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) based stimulation have been reported in animal studies, but no human studies are available on subjects with major depressive disorder. Here, the efficacy of two diagnostic MRI protocols (echo-planar diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) and T1-weighted imaging) was assessed in patients with major depressive disorder. In this double-blind randomized clinical trial, 51 patients with clinically proven major depressive disorder were randomly enrolled into three equal groups. All patients were receiving a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor as the only antidepressant treatment. The first group received echo-planar DW stimulation (DWI group), the second group received T1-weighted stimulation (T1 group), and the third group experienced a similar condition without receiving any magnetic stimulation (sham group). The Hamilton rating scale for depression (HAMD24) and Beck depression inventory (BDI) were used to assess the effect of MR stimulation on depressive symptoms. In comparison to baseline, mean HAMD24 and BDI scores significantly (p < 0.001) decreased in the DWI (by 35% and 39%) and T1 (by 38% and 39%) groups 2 weeks after MR stimulation. In the sham group, reduction in HAMD24 (19%, p = 0.04) and BDI score (15%, p = 0.07) were lower than the MR stimulation groups. Two weeks after the MR experiments, changes in mean HAMD24 score and BDI score were significantly (p < 0.05) higher in subjects treated with MR stimulation (DWI or T1) vs. sham group. In conclusion, this study demonstrated the antidepressant effects of DWI and T1 MRI protocols. Our results may point to usefulness of MR stimulation for clinical use in patients with major depressive disorder.

Keywords

Major depressive disorder Echo planar imaging Diffusion weighted imaging Magnetic resonance imaging 

Abbreviations

BDI

Beck Depression Inventory

DWI

Diffusion-weighted imaging

ECT

Electroconvulsive therapy

HAMD

Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression

LFMS

Low field magnetic stimulation

MRI

Magnetic resonance imaging

MRSI

Magnetic resonance spectroscopy imaging

RCT

Randomized clinical trial

rTMS

Repeated trans-cranial magnetic stimulation

SSRI

Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2011

Authors and Affiliations

  • Seyed Mehran Vaziri-Bozorg
    • 1
  • Ahmad Reza Ghasemi-Esfe
    • 1
  • Omid Khalilzadeh
    • 1
  • Houman Sotoudeh
    • 2
  • Hadi Rokni-Yazdi
    • 1
  • Hossein Ghanaati
    • 1
  • Kavous Firouznia
    • 1
  • Vandad Sharifi
    • 3
  • Maryam Tabatabayee
    • 3
  • Soheil Kooraki
    • 1
  • Madjid Shakiba
    • 1
  1. 1.Advanced Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology Research Center (ADIR), Imaging Medical Center, Imam HospitalTehran University of Medical SciencesTehranIran
  2. 2.Department of Radiology and Imaging, Vali Asr HospitalArak University of Medical SciencesArakIran
  3. 3.Department of Psychiatry, Rouzbeh Psychiatry HospitalTehran University of Medical SciencesTehranIran

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