Genetic effects of historical anthropogenic disturbance on a long-lived endangered tropical tree Vatica mangachapoi

  • Zhicong Dai
  • Chuncan Si
  • Deli Zhai
  • Ping Huang
  • Shanshan Qi
  • Ying Lin
  • Ruiping Wang
  • Qiongxin Zhong
  • Daolin Du
Original Paper

Abstract

The endangered Vatica mangachapoi, a long-lived, tropical tree with economic and ecological importance found in Hainan, China, was used to assess the hypothesis that historical human activities in Hainan’s tropical rain forest could have negative effects on the genetic diversity of V. mangachapoi. Three hundred and twenty individuals from 11 natural populations—which were classified into three groups according to levels of disturbance—were sampled and analyzed with ISSR markers. Although genetic diversity of V. mangachapoi is high at the species level, it is relatively low within populations. A significant genetic differentiation occurs among different disturbance levels. Significant isolation-by-distance indicated relevant historical anthropogenic changes. Our findings showed that historical human disturbances significantly increase the genetic differentiation and slightly decrease the genetic diversity of long-lived tree V. mangachapoi. Relevant targeting conservation actions were recommended.

Keywords

Endangered plant Genetic variability Human disturbance Tropical forest Vatica mangachapoi 

Supplementary material

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Supplementary material 1 (DOC 7910 kb)
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Supplementary material 2 (DOC 34 kb)
11676_2017_470_MOESM3_ESM.doc (100 kb)
Supplementary material 3 (DOC 100 kb)

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Copyright information

© Northeast Forestry University and Springer-Verlag GmbH Germany 2017

Authors and Affiliations

  • Zhicong Dai
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
  • Chuncan Si
    • 2
    • 4
  • Deli Zhai
    • 5
    • 6
  • Ping Huang
    • 2
  • Shanshan Qi
    • 2
  • Ying Lin
    • 3
    • 4
  • Ruiping Wang
    • 7
  • Qiongxin Zhong
    • 7
  • Daolin Du
    • 2
    • 3
  1. 1.Jingjiang CollegeJiangsu UniversityZhenjiangPeople’s Republic of China
  2. 2.Institute of Environment and Ecology, Academy of Environmental Health and Ecological Security, School of the Environment and Safety EngineeringJiangsu UniversityZhenjiangPeople’s Republic of China
  3. 3.Key Laboratory of Modern Agricultural Equipment and Technology, Ministry of Education and Jiangsu ProvinceJiangsu UniversityZhenjiangPeople’s Republic of China
  4. 4.Department of Biological and Chemical EngineeringJingdezhen UniversityJingdezhenPeople’s Republic of China
  5. 5.World Agroforestry Centre (ICRAF)Central and East-Asia OfficeKunmingPeople’s Republic of China
  6. 6.Centre for Mountain Ecosystem Studies (CMES), Kunming Institute of BotanyChinese Academy of SciencesKunmingPeople’s Republic of China
  7. 7.College of Life SciencesHainan Normal UniversityHaikouPeople’s Republic of China

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