Journal of Bioethical Inquiry

, 6:467

Indigenous Research: A Commitment to Walking the Talk. The Gudaga Study—an Australian Case Study

  • Jennifer A. Knight
  • Elizabeth J. Comino
  • Elizabeth Harris
  • Lisa Jackson-Pulver
Article

DOI: 10.1007/s11673-009-9186-x

Cite this article as:
Knight, J.A., Comino, E.J., Harris, E. et al. Bioethical Inquiry (2009) 6: 467. doi:10.1007/s11673-009-9186-x
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Abstract

Increasingly, the role of health research in improving the discrepancies in health outcomes between Indigenous and non-Indigenous populations in developed countries is being recognised. Along with this comes the recognition that health research must be conducted in a manner that is culturally appropriate and ethically sound. Two key documents have been produced in Australia, known as The Road Map and The Guidelines, to provide theoretical and philosophical direction to the ethics of Indigenous health research. These documents identify research themes considered critical to improving the health of the nation’s Indigenous peoples. They also provide values that, from an Indigenous perspective, are foundational to an ethical research process. This paper examines these research themes and values within the context of a current longitudinal birth cohort study of Indigenous infants and children in south-west Sydney: the Gudaga Study. Considerable time and effort have been invested in being true to the values stated in these documents: reciprocity; respect; equality; responsibility; survival and protection; and spirit and integrity. We have learnt that it is vital to be true to these values when conducting Indigenous health research—to quite literally “walk the talk”.

Keywords

Indigenous populations 

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2009

Authors and Affiliations

  • Jennifer A. Knight
    • 1
  • Elizabeth J. Comino
    • 1
  • Elizabeth Harris
    • 1
  • Lisa Jackson-Pulver
    • 2
  1. 1.Centre for Health Equity Training Research and Evaluation, Centre for Primary Health Care and Equity, School of Public Health and Community MedicineUniversity of NSWLiverpoolAustralia
  2. 2.Muru Marri Indigenous Health Unit, School of Public Health and Community MedicineUniversity of NSWSydneyAustralia

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