Journal of Thermal Spray Technology

, Volume 17, Issue 1, pp 124–135

Thermal Barrier Coatings Made by the Solution Precursor Plasma Spray Process

  • Maurice Gell
  • Eric H. Jordan
  • Matthew Teicholz
  • Baki M. Cetegen
  • Nitin P. Padture
  • Liangde Xie
  • Dianying Chen
  • Xinqing Ma
  • Jeffrey Roth
Peer Reviewed

DOI: 10.1007/s11666-007-9141-5

Cite this article as:
Gell, M., Jordan, E.H., Teicholz, M. et al. J Therm Spray Tech (2008) 17: 124. doi:10.1007/s11666-007-9141-5

Abstract

The solution precursor plasma spray (SPPS) process is a relatively new and flexible thermal spray process that can produce a wide variety of novel materials, including some with superior properties. The SPPS process involves injecting atomized droplets of a precursor solution into the plasma. The properties of resultant deposits depend on the time-temperature history of the droplets in the plasma, ranging from ultra-fine splats to unmelted crystalline particles to unpyrolized particles. By controlling the volume fraction of these three different constituents, a variety of coatings can be produced, all with a nanograin size. In this article, we will be reviewing research related to thermal barrier coatings, emphasizing the processing conditions necessary to obtain a range of microstructures and associated properties. The SPPS process produces a unique strain-tolerant, low-thermal conductivity microstructure consisting of (i) three-dimensional micrometer and nanometer pores, (ii) through-coating thickness (vertical) cracks, (iii) ultra-fine splats, and (iv) inter-pass boundaries. Both thin (0.12 mm) and thick (4 mm) coatings have been fabricated. The volume fraction of porosity can be varied from 10% to 40% while retaining the characteristic microstructure of vertical cracks and ultra-fine splats. The mechanism of vertical crack formation will be described.

Keywords

plasma spray solution precursor solution precursor plasma spray thermal barrier coatings 

Copyright information

© ASM International 2007

Authors and Affiliations

  • Maurice Gell
    • 1
  • Eric H. Jordan
    • 1
  • Matthew Teicholz
    • 1
  • Baki M. Cetegen
    • 1
  • Nitin P. Padture
    • 2
  • Liangde Xie
    • 3
  • Dianying Chen
    • 1
  • Xinqing Ma
    • 4
  • Jeffrey Roth
    • 4
  1. 1.Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Institute of Materials ScienceUniversity of ConnecticutStorrsUSA
  2. 2.Department of Materials Science and EngineeringOhio State UniversityColumbusUSA
  3. 3.Chromalloy Gas Turbine CorporationSan AntonioUSA
  4. 4.Inframat CorporationFarmingtonUSA

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