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Journal of Electronic Materials

, Volume 42, Issue 7, pp 2127–2133 | Cite as

Integration of Thermoelectric Generators and Wood Stove to Produce Heat, Hot Water, and Electrical Power

  • A.M. Goudarzi
  • P. Mazandarani
  • R. Panahi
  • H. Behsaz
  • A. RezaniaEmail author
  • L.A. Rosendahl
Article

Abstract

Traditional fire stoves are characterized by low efficiency. In this experimental study, the combustion chamber of the stove is augmented by two devices. An electric fan can increase the air-to-fuel ratio in order to increase the system’s efficiency and decrease air pollution by providing complete combustion of wood. In addition, thermoelectric generators (TEGs) produce power that can be used to satisfy all basic needs. In this study, a water-based cooling system is designed to increase the efficiency of the TEGs and also produce hot water for residential use. Through a range of tests, an average of 7.9 W was achieved by a commercial TEG with substrate area of 56 mm × 56 mm, which can produce 14.7 W output power at the maximum matched load. The total power generated by the stove is 166 W. Also, in this study a reasonable ratio of fuel to time is described for residential use. The presented prototype is designed to fulfill the basic needs of domestic electricity, hot water, and essential heat for warming the room and cooking.

Keywords

Thermoelectric generators wood stove experimental investigation 

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Copyright information

© TMS 2013

Authors and Affiliations

  • A.M. Goudarzi
    • 1
  • P. Mazandarani
    • 1
  • R. Panahi
    • 1
  • H. Behsaz
    • 1
  • A. Rezania
    • 2
    Email author
  • L.A. Rosendahl
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of Mechanical EngineeringBabol Noshiravani University of TechnologyBabolIran
  2. 2.Department of Energy TechnologyAalborg UniversityAalborgDenmark

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