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Metallurgical and Materials Transactions A

, Volume 41, Issue 5, pp 1276–1283 | Cite as

Increase in the Alpha to Gamma Transformation Temperature of Pure Iron upon Very Rapid Heating

  • Jeremy Langner
  • J.R. Cahoon
Article
  • 121 Downloads

Abstract

In recent years, laser and electron beam welding techniques have been developed with heating rates reaching 1 million K/s, and nonequilibrium microstructures sometimes result. In the present study, the alpha (bcc) to gamma (fcc) transformation in pure iron is studied using a bank of storage batteries for heating and a high speed data acquisition system to monitor the temperature determined from a thermocouple spot welded to the specimen. Heating rates up to 300,000 K/s were obtained with the transformation temperature increasing from the equilibrium value of 1185 K (912 °C) to over 2200 K (1927 °C). The results are presented in terms of continuous heating and isothermal transformation curves.

Keywords

Transformation Temperature Pure Iron Rapid Heating Isothermal Transformation Electron Beam Welding 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Notes

Acknowledgments

The authors acknowledge the financial support of NSERC Canada in the form of an Undergraduate Research Fellowship (JL) and a Discovery Grant (JRC). The technical support of Kim Majury, John Van Dorp, Don Mardis, Dan McCooeye, and Mike Boskwick is gratefully acknowledged.

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Copyright information

© The Minerals, Metals & Materials Society and ASM International 2010

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of Mechanical and Manufacturing EngineeringUniversity of ManitobaWinnipegCanada
  2. 2.Customer Engineering ServicesManitoba HydroWinnipegCanada

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