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Archives of Osteoporosis

, 14:36 | Cite as

Association between serum high-density lipoprotein cholesterol and bone health in the general population: a large and multicenter study

  • Jiuzhou Jiang
  • Pengchen Qiu
  • Yiyun Wang
  • Chenchen Zhao
  • Shunwu FanEmail author
  • Xianfeng LinEmail author
Original Article
  • 46 Downloads

Abstract

Summary

This study was a cross-sectional study and enrolled 14,147 participants after excluding. We performed a large number of data analyses to indicate that HDL-C levels were related to bone health. A high HDL-C level is an independent risk factor for bone loss both in males and females.

Introduction

Serum high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C), usually called “good” cholesterol, is beneficial for preventing cardiovascular diseases. Previous studies have indicated that HDL-C levels may be related to bone mass. We performed a cross-sectional study to examine the relationship between HDL-C levels and bone mass, both in men and women.

Methods

A total of 14,147 Chinese participants from five medical centers were enrolled in this study. Pearson’s correlation analyses, linear regression analyses, one-way ANOVAs, and logistic regression analyses were performed to assess the relationship between HDL-C levels and bone mass in various cohorts.

Results

Binary logistic regression analyses (after adjusting the confounding factors) indicated that a higher HDL-C level among males leads to a higher risk of at least osteopenia [OR (95% CI) = 1.807 (1.525, 2.142)] and osteoporosis [OR (95% CI) = 1.932 (1.291, 2.892)]. In the female group, the ORs of HDL-C for at least osteopenia [OR (95% CI) = 1.390 (1.100, 1.757)] and osteoporosis [OR (95% CI) = 1.768 (1.221, 2.560)] were still significant after adjusting for potential confounding factors except BMI. Data-standardized bivariate logistic regression analyses indicated that an increase in age is a stronger risk factor for osteoporosis and at least osteopenia than is higher HDL-C levels in females.

Conclusions

A high HDL-C level is an independent risk factor for bone loss both in males and females. Compared with high HDL-C levels, an increase in age and menopause have a much more negative effect on bone mass in females.

Keywords

High-density lipoprotein cholesterol Risk factor Bone mineral density Osteoporosis 

Abbreviations

HDL-C

high-density lipoprotein–C

BMI

body mass index

BMD

bone mineral density

UA

uric acid

ALB

albumin

Ca

serum–calcium

ALP

alkaline phosphatase

BUN

blood urea nitrogen

GLU

glucose

ALT

alanine transaminase

AST

aspartate transaminase

TBIL

total bilirubin

TC

total cholesterol

LDL-C

low-density lipoprotein cholesterol

TG

triglycerides

CKD–EPI

Chronic Kidney Disease Epidemiology Collaboration

GFR

glomerular filtration rate

QC

quality control

SBP

systolic blood pressure

DXA

dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry

CV

coefficient of variation

eGFR

estimated renal function

Notes

Funding information

This work was supported in part by the National Nature Science Fund of China (81702143, 81772387, and 81472064).

Compliance with ethical standards

Conflicts of interest

None.

Supplementary material

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Copyright information

© International Osteoporosis Foundation and National Osteoporosis Foundation 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Sir Run Run Shaw HospitalMedical College of Zhejiang UniversityHangzhouChina

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