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Archives of Osteoporosis

, Volume 6, Issue 1–2, pp 59–155 | Cite as

Osteoporosis: burden, health care provision and opportunities in the EU

A report prepared in collaboration with the International Osteoporosis Foundation (IOF) and the European Federation of Pharmaceutical Industry Associations (EFPIA)
  • O. Ström
  • F. Borgström
  • John A. Kanis
  • Juliet Compston
  • Cyrus Cooper
  • Eugene V. McCloskey
  • Bengt Jönsson
Article

Abstract

Osteoporosis, literally “porous bone”, is a disease characterized by weak bone. It is a major public health problem, affecting hundreds of millions of people worldwide, predominantly postmenopausal women. The main clinical consequence of the disease is bone fractures. It is estimated that one in three women and one in five men over the age of fifty worldwide will sustain an osteoporotic fracture. Hip and spine fractures are the two most serious fracture types, associated with substantial pain and suffering, disability, and even death. As a result, osteoporosis imposes a significant burden on both the individual and society. During the past two decades, a range of medications has become available for the treatment and prevention of osteoporosis. The primary aim of pharmacological therapy is to reduce the risk of osteoporotic fractures.

The objective of this report is to review and describe the current burden of osteoporosis and highlight recent advances and ongoing challenges...

Copyright information

© International Osteoporosis Foundation and National Osteoporosis Foundation 2011

Authors and Affiliations

  • O. Ström
    • 1
  • F. Borgström
    • 1
  • John A. Kanis
    • 2
  • Juliet Compston
    • 3
  • Cyrus Cooper
    • 4
    • 5
  • Eugene V. McCloskey
    • 6
    • 7
  • Bengt Jönsson
    • 8
  1. 1.Department of Learning, Informatics, Management, and EthicsMedical Management Centre, Karolinska InstitutetStockholmSweden
  2. 2.WHO Collaborating Centre for Metabolic Bone DiseasesUniversity of SheffieldSheffieldUK
  3. 3.Department of MedicineAddenbrooke’s Hospital, Cambridge UniversityCambridgeUK
  4. 4.MRC Lifecourse Epidemiology UnitUniversity of SouthamptonSouthamptonUK
  5. 5.NIHR Musculoskeletal Biomedical Research Unit, Institute of Musculoskeletal SciencesUniversity of OxfordOxfordUK
  6. 6.Academic Unit of Bone MetabolismNorthern General HospitalSheffieldUK
  7. 7.WHO Collaborating Centre for Metabolic Bone DiseasesUniversity of SheffieldSheffieldUK
  8. 8.Department of economicsStockholm School of EconomicsStockholmSweden

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