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Chinese Journal of Integrative Medicine

, Volume 19, Issue 7, pp 549–555 | Cite as

History of Chinese medicinal wine

  • Xun-li Xia (夏循礼)
Traditional Medicine

Abstract

Chinese medicinal wine is one type of a favorable food-drug product invented by Chinese ancestors for treating and preventing diseases, promoting people’s health and corporeity, and enriching people’s restorative culture. In the course of development of the millenary-old Chinese civilization, Chinese medicinal wine has made incessant progress and evolution. In different historical periods, Chinese medicinal wine presented different characteristics in basic wine medical applications, prescriptions, etc. There are many medical and Materia Medica monographs which have systemically and specifically reported on Chinese medicinal wine in past Chinese dynasties. By studying leading medical documents, this article made an outline review on the invention, development, and characteristics of Chinese medicinal wine.

Keywords

history Chinese medicinal wine medical documents review 

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Copyright information

© Chinese Association of the Integration of Traditional and Western Medicine and Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2013

Authors and Affiliations

  • Xun-li Xia (夏循礼)
    • 1
    • 2
  1. 1.School of Basic Medical SciencesJiangxi University of Traditional Chinese MedicineNanchangChina
  2. 2.School of Life Science and TechnologyHuazhong University of Science and TechnologyWuhanChina

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