Journal of Mountain Science

, Volume 13, Issue 7, pp 1275–1285 | Cite as

A public Cloud-based China’s Landslide Inventory Database (CsLID): development, zone, and spatiotemporal analysis for significant historical events, 1949-2011

  • Wei-yue Li
  • Chun Liu
  • Yang Hong
  • Xin-hua Zhang
  • Zhan-ming Wan
  • Manabendra Saharia
  • Wei-wei Sun
  • Dong-jing Yao
  • Wen Chen
  • Sheng Chen
  • Xiu-qin Yang
  • Yue Yue
Article

Abstract

Landslide inventory plays an important role in recording landslide events and showing their temporal-spatial distribution. This paper describes the development, visualization, and analysis of a China's Landslide Inventory Database (CsLID) by utilizing Google’s public cloud computing platform. Firstly, CsLID (Landslide Inventory Database) compiles a total of 1221 historical landslide events spanning the years 1949-2011 from relevant data sources. Secondly, the CsLID is further broken down into six zones for characterizing landslide cause-effect, spatiotemporal distribution, fatalities, and socioeconomic impacts based on the geological environment and terrain. The results show that among all the six zones, zone V, located in Qinba and Southwest Mountainous Area is the most active landslide hotspot with the highest landslide hazard in China. Additionally, the Google public cloud computing platform enables the CsLID to be easily accessible, visually interactive, and with the capability of allowing new data input to dynamically augment the database. This work developed a cyber-landslide inventory and used it to analyze the landslide temporal-spatial distribution in China.

Keywords

Landslide Inventory Zone Distribution Cloud computing 

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Copyright information

© Science Press, Institute of Mountain Hazards and Environment, CAS and Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2016

Authors and Affiliations

  • Wei-yue Li
    • 1
    • 2
  • Chun Liu
    • 2
    • 3
  • Yang Hong
    • 4
    • 5
  • Xin-hua Zhang
    • 6
  • Zhan-ming Wan
    • 4
    • 5
  • Manabendra Saharia
    • 4
    • 5
  • Wei-wei Sun
    • 7
  • Dong-jing Yao
    • 8
  • Wen Chen
    • 9
  • Sheng Chen
    • 4
    • 5
  • Xiu-qin Yang
    • 10
  • Yue Yue
    • 11
  1. 1.Institute of Urban StudyShanghai Normal UniversityShanghaiChina
  2. 2.Center for Spatial Information Science and Sustainable Development ApplicationsTongji UniversityShanghaiChina
  3. 3.College of Surveying and Geo-InformaticsTongji UniversityShanghaiChina
  4. 4.School of Civil Engineering and Environmental SciencesUniversity of OklahomaNormanUSA
  5. 5.Advanced Radar Research CenterUniversity of Oklahoma, NormanNormanUSA
  6. 6.State Key Laboratory of Hydraulics and Mountain River EngineeringSichuan UniversityChengduChina
  7. 7.College of Architectural Engineering, Civil Engineering and EnvironmentNingbo UniversityNingboChina
  8. 8.Department of GeographyShanghai Normal UniversityShanghaiChina
  9. 9.Engineering Center of SHMEC for Space Information and GNSSEast China Normal UniversityShanghaiChina
  10. 10.Applied Hydrometeorological Research InstituteNanjing University of Information Science & TechnologyNanjingChina
  11. 11.Department of StomatologyShanghai Tenth People’s Hospital of Tongji UniversityShanghaiChina

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