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Journal of Mountain Science

, Volume 9, Issue 4, pp 501–510 | Cite as

Experimental study on the viscoelastic behaviors of debris flow slurry

  • Yuyi WangEmail author
  • Rongzhi Tan
  • Kaiheng Hu
  • Feiyue Chen
  • Hongjuan Yang
  • Jinshan Zhang
  • Juan Lv
Article

Abstract

The rheological properties of most liquid in nature are between liquids and solids, including both elastic changes and viscosity changes, that is so-called “viscoelastic”. Dynamic oscillatory test was used to quantitatively study the distinct viscoelastic behaviors of debris flow slurry in the shear stress conditions for the first time in this study. The debris flow slurry samples were from Jiangjiagou Ravine, Yunnan Province, China. The experimental results were found that at the low and middle stages of shearing, when the angular velocity ω<72.46 s−1, the loss modulus (G″) was greater than the storage modulus (G′), i.e. G″>G′. At the late stage of shearing, when the angular velocity ω≧72.46 s−1, the storage modulus was greater than or equal to the loss modulus, i.e. G′G″, tan δ≦1 (where phase-shift angle δ=G″/G′), and the debris flow slurry was in a gel state. Therefore, the progress of this experimental study further reveals the mechanism of hyperconcentrated debris flows with a high velocity on low-gradient ravines.

Keywords

Loss modulus (G″Storage modulus (G′Viscoelastic behaviors Gel state 

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Copyright information

© Science Press, Institute of Mountain Hazards and Environment, CAS and Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2012

Authors and Affiliations

  • Yuyi Wang
    • 1
    • 2
    Email author
  • Rongzhi Tan
    • 1
    • 2
  • Kaiheng Hu
    • 1
    • 2
  • Feiyue Chen
    • 3
  • Hongjuan Yang
    • 1
    • 2
  • Jinshan Zhang
    • 1
    • 2
  • Juan Lv
    • 2
  1. 1.Key Laboratory of Mountain Hazards and Earth Surface Process, Dongchuan Debris Flow Observation and Research StationChinese Academy of SciencesChengduChina
  2. 2.Institute of Mountain Hazards and EnvironmentChinese Academy of SciencesChengduChina
  3. 3.Shanghai Representative OfficeAnton Paar GmbHShanghaiChina

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