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Journal of Mountain Science

, Volume 9, Issue 4, pp 523–528 | Cite as

Slope seismic response monitoring on the aftershocks of the Wenchuan earthquake in the Mianzhu section

  • Yunsheng Wang
  • Yonghong LuoEmail author
  • Fuhai Wang
  • Dong Wang
  • Xiao Ma
  • Shun Li
  • Xi Deng
Article

Abstract

Previous investigations have shown that the seismic response of slopes during the Wenchuan earthquake was highly variable. The present study tries to give an answer to the question: Which are the main factors affecting the seismic response degree of slopes? With the support of the China Geological Survey Bureau, we set 3 monitoring sections in Jiulong slope, Mianzhu city, China with the aim to record the site response of the slope during the aftershocks of the Wenchuan earthquake. After the Wenchuan earthquake, which happened on 12 May 2008, 30 aftershocks have been recorded in these monitoring points. We analyzed 11 records, with magnitudes ranging from ML = 4.6 to ML = 3.1. The amplification factors of the horizontal compound PGA and 3D compound PGA have been determined for the 3 points at different elevations on the slope. Results showed that the dynamic response of the slope on the earthquake was controlled by factors such as topography and the thickness of the Quaternary overburden.

Keywords

Seismic response Slope Monitoring Longmen Mountains Aftershocks Wenchuan earthquake 

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Copyright information

© Science Press, Institute of Mountain Hazards and Environment, CAS and Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2012

Authors and Affiliations

  • Yunsheng Wang
    • 1
  • Yonghong Luo
    • 1
    Email author
  • Fuhai Wang
    • 1
  • Dong Wang
    • 1
  • Xiao Ma
    • 1
  • Shun Li
    • 1
  • Xi Deng
    • 1
  1. 1.State Key Lab of Geohazard Prevention and Environment ProtectionChengdu University of TechnologyChengduChina

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