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Journal of Mountain Science

, Volume 8, Issue 2, pp 109–116 | Cite as

Measuring the internal velocity of debris flows using impact pressure detecting in the flume experiment

  • Hongjuan Yang
  • Fangqiang WeiEmail author
  • Kaiheng Hu
  • Sergey Chernomorets
  • Yong Hong
  • Xiaoyu Li
  • Tao Xie
Article

Abstract

Measuring the internal velocity of debris flows is very important for debris flow dynamics research and designing debris flow control works. However, there is no appropriate method for measuring the internal velocity because of the destructive power of debris flow process. In this paper, we address this problem by using the relationship between velocity and kinetic pressure, as described by surface velocity and surface kinetic pressure data. Kinetic pressure is the difference of impact pressure and static pressure. The former is detected by force sensors installed in the flow direction at the sampling section. Observations show that static pressure can be computed using the formula for static water pressure by simply substituting water density for debris flow density. We describe the relationship between surface velocity and surface kinetic pressure using data from seven laboratory flume experiments. It is consistent with the relationship for single phase flow, which is the measurement principle of the Pitot tube.

Keywords

Internal velocity Measurement Debris flow Impact pressure 

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Copyright information

© Science Press, Institute of Mountain Hazards and Environment, CAS and Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2011

Authors and Affiliations

  • Hongjuan Yang
    • 1
    • 2
  • Fangqiang Wei
    • 2
    Email author
  • Kaiheng Hu
    • 2
  • Sergey Chernomorets
    • 3
  • Yong Hong
    • 2
  • Xiaoyu Li
    • 2
  • Tao Xie
    • 2
  1. 1.Key Laboratory of Mountain Hazards and Surface ProcessChinese Academy of SciencesChengduChina
  2. 2.Institute of Mountain Hazards and EnvironmentChinese Academy of SciencesChengduChina
  3. 3.Faculty of GeographyMoscow State UniversityMoscowRussia

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