Sustainability Science

, Volume 7, Issue 2, pp 253–265 | Cite as

Development of an educational model for sustainability science: challenges in the Mind–Skills–Knowledge education at Ibaraki University

ORIGINAL ARTICLE

Abstract

Modern society confronts multiple sustainability challenges, including population growth, resources limitations, and a deteriorating environment. As a response, sustainability science education plays a major role in developing human capacity to manage these issues. This paper proposes the concept of “sustainability science education across Mind–Skills–Knowledge” as well as the competencies to be acquired and its pedagogy. This paper evaluates the effectiveness of such an educational system and its method of implementation using the example of the Graduate Program on Sustainability Science (GPSS), which was started at Ibaraki University in 2009.

Keywords

Sustainability science education Skills Mind Knowledge 

References

  1. Asaoka Y (2006) What is environmental education: objective, concept, and evaluation. In: Asaoka Y (ed) Implementation of new environmental education. Kobundo Shuppan, Tokyo, pp 11–31Google Scholar
  2. Choucri N, Mistree D, Haghseta F, Mehzer T, Baker WR, Ortiz CI, Mezher T (2007) Mapping sustainability: knowledge e-Networking and the value chain. Springer, DordrechtGoogle Scholar
  3. Clark WC (2007) Sustainability science: a room of its own. Proc Natl Acad Sci 104(6):1737–1738CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  4. Clark WC, Dickson NM (2003) Sustainability science: the emerging research program. Proc Natl Acad Sci 100(14):8059–8061CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  5. Curriculum Research Center of National Institute for Educational Policy Research (2007) Environmental education guide for elementary school. Toyokan Publishing, TokyoGoogle Scholar
  6. Furihata S (2006) Making natural experience responsible behavior: theory of natural experience. In: Asaoka Y (ed) Implementation of new environmental education. Kobundo Shuppan, Tokyo, pp 73–105Google Scholar
  7. Furihata S, Takahashi M (2009) Blueprint of modern environmental thought and implementation of new environmental education. In: Furihata S, Takahashi M (eds) Introduction to modern environmental education. Tsukuba Shobo, Tokyo, pp 9–22Google Scholar
  8. Ibaraki University (2009) Reports on fieldwork in sustainability (international and domestic) of 2009. Graduate Program on Sustainability Science at Ibaraki University, MitoGoogle Scholar
  9. Ikeda H (2010) Meaning of the function of “BA” in preliminary class for CBI. Kochi University Reports of Educational Research and Activity, vol 14. pp 17–34Google Scholar
  10. Ito T (2008) Sustainability science and structure of dialog: living in an inter-local situation. In: Mimura N, Ito T, Tamura M, Sato Y (eds) Creating sustainability science: aiming for sustainable global, social, and human systems. Shin-yo-sha Publishing, Tokyo, pp 223–240Google Scholar
  11. Kates RW, Clark WC, Corell R, Hall JM, Jaeger CC, Lowe I, McCarthy JJ, Schellnhuber HJ, Bolin B, Dickson NM, Faucheux S, Gallopin GC, Grübler A, Huntley B, Jäger J, Jodha NS, Kasperson RE, Mabogunje A, Matson P, Mooney H, Moore B 3rd, O’Riordan T, Svedin U (2001) Environment and development. Sustainability science. Science 292(5517):641–642CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  12. Komiyama H, Takeuchi K (2006) Sustainability science: building a new discipline. Sustain Sci 1(1):1–6CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  13. Miller J (2007) The holistic curriculum, 2nd edn. University of Toronto Press, TorontoGoogle Scholar
  14. Ministry of Education (1991) Environment education guide for junior and senior high schools. National Printing Bureau (formerly Printing Bureau of the Ministry of Finance), TokyoGoogle Scholar
  15. Mino T, Shimoda Y (2011) Sustainability education by IR3S universities. In: Komiyama H, Takeuchi K, Shiroyama H, Mino T (eds) Sustainability science: a multidisciplinary approach. United Nations University Press, Tokyo, pp 416–431Google Scholar
  16. Oguri Y (2006) Educational concept and environmental education for sustainability development: theory of ESD. In: Asaoka Y (ed) Implementation of new environmental education. Kobundo Shuppan, Tokyo, pp 140–171Google Scholar
  17. Omori T (2006) Children and environmental education: theory of environmental education at school. In: Asaoka Y (ed) Implementation of new environmental education. Kobundo Shuppan, Tokyo, pp 32–51Google Scholar
  18. Onuki M, Mino T (2009) Sustainability education and a new master’s degree, the master of sustainability science: the Graduate Program in Sustainability Science (GPSS) at the University of Tokyo. Sustain Sci 4(1):55–59CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  19. Sato M (2009) Development from environmental education to ESD. In: Furihata S, Takahashi M (eds) Introduction to modern environmental education. Tsukuba Shobo, Tokyo, pp 115–132Google Scholar
  20. Segalàs J, Ferrer-Balas D, Svanström M, Lundqvist U, Mulder KF (2009) What has to be learnt for sustainability? A comparison of bachelor engineering education competences at three European universities. Sustain Sci 4(1):17–27CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  21. Tamura M, Uegaki T (2011) Core competencies. In: Komiyama H, Takeuchi K, Shiroyama H, Mino T (eds) Sustainability science: a multidisciplinary approach. United Nations University Press, Tokyo, pp 366–373Google Scholar
  22. United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO) (2005) United Nations decade of education for sustainable development (2005–2014): international implementation scheme. UNESCO, ParisGoogle Scholar
  23. United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO) (2007) The UN decade of education for sustainable development (DESD 2005–2014): the first two years. UNESCO, ParisGoogle Scholar
  24. Uwasu M, Yabar H, Hara K, Shimoda Y, Saijo T (2009) Educational initiative of Osaka University in sustainability science: mobilizing science and technology towards sustainability. Sustain Sci 4(1):45–53CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  25. Wiek A, Withycombe L, Redman CL (2011) Key competencies in sustainability: a reference framework for academic program development. Sustain Sci 6(2):203–218CrossRefGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer 2012

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.The Institute for Global Change Adaptation Science (ICAS)Ibaraki UniversityMitoJapan
  2. 2.College of Sustainable System SciencesOsaka Prefecture UniversityOsakaJapan

Personalised recommendations