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Training Primary Care Physicians to Serve Underserved Communities: Follow-up Survey of Primary Care Graduates

  • Lisa Altshuler
  • Harriet FisherEmail author
  • Kathleen Hanley
  • Jasmine Ross
  • Sondra Zabar
  • Jennifer Adams
  • Mack Lipkin
Concise Research Report
  • 66 Downloads

Increasing proportions of primary care (PC) physicians enhance population life expectancy and quality of life.1 Basu et al. found that “… as the density of primary care physicians decreased from 46.6 to 41.4 per 100, 000 population” mortality increased.2 For the underserved, need for PCPs is higher, supply is worse, and attrition is greater due to burnout and leaving practice.3 Thus, effective training programs are necessary to prepare competent, committed, resilient doctors to practice PC, particularly with underserved communities.

Our prior, 2006, survey of 20 years of graduates from the NYU/Bellevue Primary Care Internal Medicine Residency (NYUBPC) concluded that program graduates’ high engagement in PC (over 90%) and unexpectedly low (15%) burnout relate to our program pillars: psychosocial medicine, clinical epidemiology, health policy, learning to learn and teach, being whole (patients and learners), and visioning—layered over rigorous inner-city clinical training.4

This report...

Notes

Compliance with Ethical Standards

Conflict of Interest

The authors declare that they do not have a conflict of interest.

References

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    Starfield B, Shi L, Macinko J. Contribution of primary care to health systems and health. The Milbank quarterly. 2005;83(3):457–502.  https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1468-0009.2005.00409.x CrossRefPubMedPubMedCentralGoogle Scholar
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    Basu S, Berkowitz SA, Phillips RL, Bitton A, Landon BE, Phillips RS. Association of Primary Care Physician Supply With Population Mortality in the United States, 2005-2015Association of US Primary Care Physician Supply and Population MortalityAssociation of US Primary Care Physician Supply and Population Mortality. JAMA Internal Medicine. 2019;179(4):506–14.  https://doi.org/10.1001/jamainternmed.2018.7624 CrossRefPubMedGoogle Scholar
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    Zabar S, Wallach A, Kalet A. The Future of Primary Care in the United States Depends on Payment ReformThe Future of US Primary Care Depends on Payment ReformResearch. JAMA Internal Medicine. 2019;179(4):515–6.  https://doi.org/10.1001/jamainternmed.2018.7623 CrossRefPubMedGoogle Scholar
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    Lipkin M, Zabar SR, Kalet AL, Laponis R, Kachur E, Anderson M, et al. Two decades of Title VII support of a primary care residency: process and outcomes. Acad Med. 2008;83(11):1064–70.  https://doi.org/10.1097/ACM.0b013e31818928ab CrossRefPubMedPubMedCentralGoogle Scholar
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    Dyrbye LN, Varkey P, Boone SL, Satele DV, Sloan JA, Shanafelt TD. Physician Satisfaction and Burnout at Different Career Stages. Mayo Clinic Proceedings. 2013;88(12):1358–67.  https://doi.org/10.1016/j.mayocp.2013.07.016 CrossRefPubMedGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Society of General Internal Medicine 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  • Lisa Altshuler
    • 1
  • Harriet Fisher
    • 1
    Email author
  • Kathleen Hanley
    • 1
  • Jasmine Ross
    • 2
  • Sondra Zabar
    • 1
  • Jennifer Adams
    • 1
  • Mack Lipkin
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Medicine New York University School of MedicineNew YorkUSA
  2. 2.Department of Pediatrics New York University School of MedicineNew YorkUSA

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