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Journal of General Internal Medicine

, Volume 34, Issue 11, pp 2339–2341 | Cite as

Impact of State Laws Restricting Opioid Duration on Characteristics of New Opioid Prescriptions

  • Chintan V. DaveEmail author
  • Elisabetta Patorno
  • Jessica M. Franklin
  • Krista Huybrechts
  • Ameet Sarpatwari
  • Aaron S. Kesselheim
  • Brian T. Bateman
Concise Research Reports

With opioid-related overdose deaths in the USA reaching 50,000 in 2017,1 federal and state governments have struggled to respond to this growing crisis. Because nearly half of these deaths involve a prescription opioid, there is growing interest in limiting the amount of opioid dispensed to opioid-naïve patients.2 In March 2016, Massachusetts (MA) became the first state to restrict opioid duration for opioid-naïve patients to seven days, citing Centers for Disease Control and Prevention guidelines.3 Connecticut (CT) and New-York (NY) implemented similar legislation later that year. Currently, 33 states either have implemented or are in the process of implementation similar legislation. The objective of this study was to assess the impact of these laws—in the three states that implemented them in 2016—on the characteristics of new opioid prescriptions.

METHODS

The study utilized de-identified Optum© Clinformatics® Datamart (January 2014–September 2017), a commercial claims database. The...

Notes

Funding Source

This study was funded by the Division of Pharmacoepidemiology and Pharmacoeconomics, Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA. Dr. Patorno was supported by a career development grant (K08AG055670) from the National Institute on Aging. Work on this topic from Drs. Kesselheim, Sarpatwari, and Dave was also supported by the Laura and John Arnold Foundation. Drs. Kesselheim and Sarpatwari are also supported by the Harvard Program in Therapeutic Science and the Engelberg Foundation.

Compliance with Ethical Standards

Conflict of Interest

The authors declare that they do not have a conflict of interest.

References

  1. 1.
    Overdose Death Rates, Revised August 2018 https://www.drugabuse.gov/related-topics/trends-statistics/overdose-death-rates. Accessed 9 May 2019
  2. 2.
    Bateman BT, Choudhry NK. Limiting the duration of opioid prescriptions: Balancing excessive prescribing and the effective treatment of pain. JAMA Intern Med 2016;176(5):583–584.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  3. 3.
    Dowell D, Haegerich TM, Chou R. CDC guideline for prescribing opioids for chronic pain—United States, 2016. JAMA. 2016;315(15):1624–1645.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  4. 4.
    Mundkur ML, Rough K, Huybrechts KF, et al. Patterns of opioid initiation at first visits for pain in United States primary care settings. Pharmacoepidemiol Drug Saf 2017.Google Scholar
  5. 5.
    Opioid Overdose Death Rates and All Drug Overdose Death Rates per 100,000 Population (Age-Adjusted). https://www.kff.org/other/state-indicator/opioid-overdose-death-rates/?currentTimeframe=0&sortModel=%7B%22colId%22:%22Location%22,%22sort%22:%22asc%22%7D. Accessed 9 May 2019

Copyright information

© Society of General Internal Medicine 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  • Chintan V. Dave
    • 1
    Email author
  • Elisabetta Patorno
    • 1
  • Jessica M. Franklin
    • 1
  • Krista Huybrechts
    • 1
  • Ameet Sarpatwari
    • 2
  • Aaron S. Kesselheim
    • 2
  • Brian T. Bateman
    • 1
  1. 1.Division of Pharmacoepidemiology and Pharmacoeconomics, Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women’s HospitalHarvard Medical SchoolBostonUSA
  2. 2.Program On Regulation, Therapeutics, And Law (PORTAL), Division of Pharmacoepidemiology and Pharmacoeconomics, Department of MedicineBrigham and Women’s HospitalBostonUSA

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