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Journal of General Internal Medicine

, Volume 34, Issue 7, pp 1077–1078 | Cite as

The Impact of Resident Geographic Rounding on Rapid Responses

  • Alexander Williams
  • Chad DeMottEmail author
  • Shari Whicker
  • Mariah Rudd
  • Ellen Rachel Lockhart
  • Pavan Isanaka
  • Christa Witt
Concise Research Reports

INTRODUCTION

Geographic localization and interdisciplinary team rounding (IDTs) are increasingly prevalent within hospitals. Potential benefits include decreased length of stay,1 improved physician-staff communication and collaboration,2, 3 increased face time with patients,2 enhanced efficiency,2, 4, 5 decreased readmission,6 and possibly even decreased healthcare costs.1

Although the implementation of these systems, geographic rounding and rapid response teams (RRT), are by no means “cutting edge,” they are growing in popularity. As such, many challenges and possible benefits associated with these practice changes have yet to be clarified within the literature. With academic health systems incorporating growing numbers of learners into their rounds and as learner training emphasizes increased familiarity with nursing, could geographic rounding unlock potential benefits to patient care? This study specifically sought to determine if resident-run geographic units yielded a decrease in...

Notes

Acknowledgments

Tamela Morgan MBA, RN, CPPS, CPHQ

Brandie Bailey MSN, RN, NEA-BC

Compliance with Ethical Standards

Conflict of Interest

The authors declare that they do not have a conflict of interest.

References

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Copyright information

© Society of General Internal Medicine 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  • Alexander Williams
    • 1
  • Chad DeMott
    • 2
    • 3
    Email author
  • Shari Whicker
    • 2
  • Mariah Rudd
    • 2
  • Ellen Rachel Lockhart
    • 3
  • Pavan Isanaka
    • 2
  • Christa Witt
    • 2
  1. 1.Virginia Tech Carilion Internal Medicine ResidencyRoanokeUSA
  2. 2.Virginia Tech Carilion School of MedicineRoanokeUSA
  3. 3.Carilion ClinicRoanokeUSA

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