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Journal of General Internal Medicine

, Volume 34, Issue 4, pp 507–509 | Cite as

A Cross-sectional Survey Using Clinical Vignettes to Examine Overdose Risk Assessment and Willingness to Prescribe Naloxone

  • J. Deanna WilsonEmail author
  • Justin Berk
  • Pamela Matson
  • Natalie Spicyn
  • Anika Alvanzo
  • Hoover Adger
  • Leonard Feldman
Concise Research Reports

INTRODUCTION

The number of opioid-related overdose deaths has increased concurrently with rising rates of opioid use nationally.1 Clinical encounters offer an opportunity to provide high-risk patients with targeted interventions,2 yet clinicians routinely miss the opportunity to deliver risk reduction counseling and naloxone to appropriate patients3 due, in part, to knowledge gaps.4, 5

To better identify physician education targets, we examined how internal medicine trainees’ beliefs influence willingness to prescribe naloxone, how residents assess risk of opioid-related overdose, and concordance between risk assessment and naloxone prescription.

METHODS

The study occurred at an academic medical center in Baltimore, MD, with high rates of opioid use and overdose. IRB deemed our study exempt. We surveyed internal medicine residents and collected information on beliefs and behaviors based on seven clinical vignettes. Each vignette provided patient-specific information including age,...

KEY WORDS

clinical vignette medical education-systems based practice substance abuse vulnerable populations 

Notes

Acknowledgements

This work was delivered as a presentation in November 2016 at the Association for Medical Education and Research in Substance Abuse Meeting.

Funding Information

This work was supported by Johns Hopkins University Scholars’ Fund. Dr. Wilson was supported by HRSA LEAH (T71MC08054) and NIH (T32HD052459-07). Dr. Matson was supported by NIDA K01DA035387.

Compliance with Ethical Standards

Conflict of Interest

The authors do not have conflicts of interest to disclose.

References

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Copyright information

© Society of General Internal Medicine 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • J. Deanna Wilson
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
    Email author
  • Justin Berk
    • 1
    • 2
  • Pamela Matson
    • 1
  • Natalie Spicyn
    • 1
    • 2
  • Anika Alvanzo
    • 2
  • Hoover Adger
    • 1
  • Leonard Feldman
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of Pediatrics, Division of General Pediatrics and Adolescent MedicineJohns Hopkins University School of MedicineBaltimoreUSA
  2. 2.Department of Internal Medicine, Division of General Internal MedicineJohns Hopkins University School of MedicineBaltimoreUSA
  3. 3.Divisions of General Internal MedicineUniversity of Pittsburgh School of MedicinePittsburghUSA

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