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Pap Testing in the USA and Potential Association with HPV Vaccination: a Cross-sectional Analysis of the BRFSS Data (2007–2016)

  • Dongyu Zhang
  • Xuezheng Sun
Concise Research Reports

INTRODUCTION

The US Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) recommends women aged 21–65 years should undergo Papanicolaou test (Pap test) every 3 years to prevent cervical cancer.1 However, no nationwide representative population-based research described Pap test use from a temporal perspective in the past decade. This brief report describes the temporal trend of Pap test use in the USA between 2007 and 2016. Considering that human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination may affect screening behaviors, we further assessed the 10-year trend of HPV vaccination and its association with Pap test use.

METHODS

We used the Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS) data for the current analysis, and five intervals were generated (2007–2008, 2009–2010, 2011–2012, 2013–2014, and 2015–2016).

First, we summarized the trend of Pap test within the 10-year period by treating women having a test within the last 3 years as the outcome; the analysis was conducted for the overall sample and subgroups...

KEY WORDS

cancer screening Pap test cervical cancer prevention HPV vaccination 

Notes

Compliance with Ethical Standards

Conflict of Interest

The authors declare that they do not have a conflict of interest.

Ethical Approval

IRB approval was not required as our study used publicly available dataset.

References

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    Healthy people 2020: increase the proportion of women who receive a cervical cancer screening based on the most recent guidelines. https://www.healthypeople.gov/2020/data-search/Search-the-Data#objid=4053. Last accessed 8 May 2018.
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    Introducing healthy people 2020. https://www.healthypeople.gov/2020/About-Healthy-People. Last accessed 8 May 2018.
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    Cervical Cancer Trends. https://www.cdc.gov/cancer/cervical/statistics/trends.htm. Last accessed 31 May 2018.
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    Kim JJ, Burger EA, Sy S, Campos NG. Optimal cervical cancer screening in women vaccinated against human papillomavirus. J Natl Cancer Inst 2017;109(2).  https://doi.org/10.1093/jnci/djw216

Copyright information

© Society of General Internal Medicine 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of OncologyGeorgetown University School of MedicineWashingtonUSA
  2. 2.Department of Epidemiology University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Gillings School of Global Public HealthChapel HillUSA

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