Advertisement

Journal of General Internal Medicine

, Volume 34, Issue 1, pp 164–164 | Cite as

Correction to: Do Words Matter? Stigmatizing Language and the Transmission of Bias in the Medical Record

  • Anna P. Goddu
  • Katie J. O’Conor
  • Sophie Lanzkron
  • Mustapha O. Saheed
  • Somnath Saha
  • Monica E. Peek
  • Carlton HaywoodJr
  • Mary Catherine Beach
Correction

Correction to: Journal of General Internal Medicine

  https://doi.org/10.1007/s11606-017-4289-2

In the HTML version of this paper, Ms. Goddu was incorrectly listed. The correct citation should be AP Goddu.

In the abstract, several results were not updated to match the manuscript. ​The correct values for the abstract are: Exposure to the stigmatizing language note was associated with more negative attitudes towards the patient (20.3 stigmatizing vs. 25.1 neutral, p < 0.001). Reading the stigmatizing language note was associated with less aggressive management of the patient’s pain (4.7 stigmatizing vs. 5.3 neutral, p < 0.001).

Copyright information

© Society of General Internal Medicine 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • Anna P. Goddu
    • 1
  • Katie J. O’Conor
    • 1
  • Sophie Lanzkron
    • 2
  • Mustapha O. Saheed
    • 3
  • Somnath Saha
    • 4
    • 5
  • Monica E. Peek
    • 6
  • Carlton HaywoodJr
    • 2
  • Mary Catherine Beach
    • 1
  1. 1.Johns Hopkins University School of MedicineBaltimoreUSA
  2. 2.Division of HematologyJohns Hopkins University School of MedicineBaltimoreUSA
  3. 3.Department of Emergency MedicineJohns Hopkins University School of MedicineBaltimoreUSA
  4. 4.Section of General Internal MedicineVA Portland Health Care SystemPortlandUSA
  5. 5.Division of General Internal Medicine and GeriatricsOregon Health and Science UniversityPortlandUSA
  6. 6.Section of General Internal MedicineThe University of ChicagoChicagoUSA

Personalised recommendations