Advertisement

Journal of General Internal Medicine

, Volume 33, Issue 8, pp 1235–1238 | Cite as

Treat the Patient, Not the Pain: Using a Multidimensional Assessment Tool to Facilitate Patient-Centered Chronic Pain Care

  • Dale J. LangfordEmail author
  • David J. Tauben
  • John A. Sturgeon
  • Daniel S. Godfrey
  • Mark D. Sullivan
  • Ardith Z. Doorenbos
Concise Research Reports

THE NEED FOR MULTIDIMENSIONAL CHRONIC PAIN ASSESSMENT

Chronic pain is common, complex, costly, and distressing to patients, families, and clinicians. Despite multiple national initiatives,1,2 improvements in chronic pain management have been limited. In fact, an estimated 40–60% of patients with chronic pain have inadequate pain management.3 This lack of progress may partly be due to the multidimensionality of chronic pain, which is not routinely incorporated into its assessment and management. A patient-centered approach—that accounts for patient-specific goals and patient-reported outcomes and can be implemented in a congested, time-limited primary care clinic setting—is needed to achieve the primary goals of chronic pain management, including reduction of pain impact and improvement of function and quality of life.3,4

A QUESTION UNASKED IS AN ANSWER UNLEARNED: USE OF A PATIENT-REPORTED OUTCOMES TOOL TO PROVIDE MULTI-MODAL CHRONIC PAIN CARE

To facilitate individually tailored,...

KEY WORDS

chronic pain pain management assessment patient-centered care 

Notes

Acknowledgements

Contributors: University of Washington Clinical Informatics Research Group

Funding Information

This work was supported by the National Institute of Nursing Research of the National Institutes of Health under award number K24 NR015340 (Doorenbos). PainTracker development was previously supported by a University of Washington Center for Commercialization project award (Sullivan) and a Pfizer Medical Education grant (Sullivan).

Compliance with Ethical Standards

Conflict of Interest

None of the authors have any conflicts of interest to disclose.

References

  1. 1.
    Relieving Pain in America: A Blueprint for Transforming Prevention, Care, Education, and Research. Washington, DC. The National Academies Collection: Reports funded by National Institutes of Health; 2011.Google Scholar
  2. 2.
    Department of Health and Human Services: National Pain Strategy: A Comprehensive Population Health Strategy for Pain. Available at: https://iprcc.nih.gov/sites/default/files/HHSNational_Pain_Strategy_508C.pdf Accessed March, 2018.
  3. 3.
    Mills, S., Torrance, N. & Smith, B. H. Identification and Management of Chronic Pain in Primary Care: a Review. Curr Psychiatry Rep 2016; 18:22.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  4. 4.
    The Interagency Pain Research Coordinating Committee: Federal Pain Research Strategy. Available at: https://iprcc.nih.gov/sites/default/files/iprcc/FPRS_Research_Recommendations_Final_508C.pdf Accessed March, 2018.
  5. 5.
    Tauben, D. Chronic Pain Management: Measurement-Based Step Care Solutions. IASP: PAIN Clinical Updates. 2012; 20:1–8.Google Scholar
  6. 6.
    Schorn, M. M., Doorenbos, A. Z., Gordon, D. & Read-Williams, P. Survey of Primary-Care Providers on Perceived Benefits of and Barriers to PainTracker. J Nurse Pract. 2014; 10:781–786.CrossRefGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Society of General Internal Medicine 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • Dale J. Langford
    • 1
    Email author
  • David J. Tauben
    • 1
  • John A. Sturgeon
    • 1
  • Daniel S. Godfrey
    • 1
  • Mark D. Sullivan
    • 2
  • Ardith Z. Doorenbos
    • 3
  1. 1.Department of Anesthesiology and Pain Medicine University of WashingtonSeattleUSA
  2. 2.Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral SciencesSeattleUSA
  3. 3.Department of Biobehavioral Nursing and Health InformaticsSeattleUSA

Personalised recommendations