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Journal of General Internal Medicine

, Volume 33, Issue 5, pp 602–604 | Cite as

Individualizing PSA Monitoring Among Older Prostate Cancer Survivors

  • Ying Shi
  • Kathy Z. Fung
  • W. John Boscardin
  • Sarah Ngo
  • Stephen J. Freedland
  • Melisa L. Wong
  • Louise C. Walter
Concise Research Reports

KEY WORDS

aging survivorship PSA monitoring prostate cancer 

Notes

Funding Information

This work was supported by the National Institute on Aging at the National Institutes of Health (grant number K24AG041180) to [LW].

The funding sources had no role in the design, conduct, or analysis of this study or in the decision to submit the manuscript for publication.

Compliance with Ethical Standards

The Committee on Human Research at the University of California, San Francisco, and the Committee for Research and Development at the San Francisco VA Medical Center approved this study. The corresponding author, Louise Walter, had full access to all of the data in the study and takes responsibility for the integrity of the data and the accuracy of the data analysis. The datasets generated during and/or analyzed during the current study are not publicly available because Veterans Affairs data are not publicly available. However, all datasets used in this study are available to VA investigators through VIReC, http://vaww.virec.research.va.gov/Index-VACMS.htm

Conflict of Interest

The authors declare that they do not have a conflict of interest.

References

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Copyright information

© Society of General Internal Medicine (outside the USA) 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • Ying Shi
    • 1
    • 2
  • Kathy Z. Fung
    • 1
    • 2
  • W. John Boscardin
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
  • Sarah Ngo
    • 1
    • 2
  • Stephen J. Freedland
    • 4
    • 5
  • Melisa L. Wong
    • 1
    • 2
    • 6
  • Louise C. Walter
    • 1
    • 2
  1. 1.Division of GeriatricsSan Francisco VA Health Care System 181GSan FranciscoUSA
  2. 2.Division of GeriatricsUniversity of California, San FranciscoSan FranciscoUSA
  3. 3.Department of Epidemiology and BiostatisticsUniversity of California, San FranciscoSan FranciscoUSA
  4. 4.Center for Integrated Research on Cancer and Lifestyle, Samuel Oschin Comprehensive Cancer Institute, Cedars-Sinai Medical CenterLos AngelesUSA
  5. 5.Division of Urology, Durham VA Medical CenterDurhamUSA
  6. 6.Division of Hematology/OncologyUniversity of California, San FranciscoSan FranciscoUSA

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