Journal of General Internal Medicine

, Volume 33, Issue 1, pp 19–20 | Cite as

Missed Doses of Venous Thromboembolism (VTE) Prophylaxis at Community Hospitals: Cause for Alarm

  • Brandyn D. Lau
  • Michael B. Streiff
  • Peggy S. Kraus
  • Deborah B. Hobson
  • Dauryne L. Shaffer
  • Jonathan K. Aboagye
  • Peter J. Pronovost
  • Elliott R. Haut
Concise Research Letters

KEY WORDS

venous thromboembolism quality improvement safety 

Notes

Acknowledgements

Contributors

We would like to thank Ann Hoffman, MBA, and Shamil Fayzullin for their assistance in obtaining medication administration data.

Funders

This project was supported by contract CE-12-11-4489 “Preventing Venous Thromboembolism: Empowering Patients and Enabling Patient-Centered Care via Health Information Technology” from The Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Institute (PCORI).

Compliance with Ethical Standards

Conflict of Interest

Mr. Lau and Drs. Streiff and Haut are supported by a grant from the AHRQ (1R01HS024547) entitled “Individualized Performance Feedback on Venous Thromboembolism Prevention Practice,” a contract from PCORI entitled “Preventing Venous Thromboembolism (VTE): Engaging Patients to Reduce Preventable Harm from Missed/Refused Doses of VTE Prophylaxis,” and a grant from the NIH/NHLBI (R21HL129028) entitled “Analysis of the Impact of Missed Doses of Venous Thromboembolism Prophylaxis.” Mr. Lau is supported by the Institute for Excellence in Education Berkheimer Faculty Education Scholar Grant and a contract (AD-1306-03980) from the Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Institute (PCORI) entitled “Patient-Centered Approaches to Collect Sexual Orientation/Gender Identity Information in the Emergency Department.” Ms. Hobson has given expert witness testimony in various medical malpractice cases. Dr. Pronovost reports consultancy fees from the Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology, Inc.; grant or contract support from the Agency for Healthcare Research & Quality, National Institutes of Health, Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Institute, and The Commonwealth Fund; honoraria from various hospitals and the Leigh Bureau (Somerville, NJ); and royalties from his book, Safe Patients, Smart Hospitals. Dr. Streiff has received research funding from Portola and Janssen, consulted for Bio2 Medical, CSL Behring, Merck and Janssen Healthcare, and has given expert witness testimony in various medical malpractice cases. Dr. Haut is a paid consultant and speaker for the “Preventing Avoidable Venous Thromboembolism—Every Patient, Every Time” VHA/Vizient IMPERATIV® Advantage Performance Improvement Collaborative. Dr. Haut receives royalties from Lippincott, Williams & Wilkins for the book Avoiding Common ICU Errors. Dr. Haut is a paid consultant and speaker for the Illinois Surgical Quality Improvement Collaborative (ISQIC). Dr. Haut was the paid author of a paper commissioned by the National Academies of Medicine titled “Military Trauma Care’s Learning Health System: The Importance of Data Driven Decision Making,” which was used to support the report titled A National Trauma Care System: Integrating Military and Civilian Trauma Systems to Achieve Zero Preventable Deaths After Injury. All other authors declare that they have no conflict of interest.

References

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    Shermock KM, Lau BD, Haut ER, et al. Patterns of non-administration of ordered doses of venous thromboembolism prophylaxis: Implications for novel intervention strategies. PLoS ONE. 2013;8(6):e66311.CrossRefPubMedPubMedCentralGoogle Scholar
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Copyright information

© Society of General Internal Medicine 2017

Authors and Affiliations

  • Brandyn D. Lau
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
    • 4
  • Michael B. Streiff
    • 3
    • 5
    • 6
  • Peggy S. Kraus
    • 7
  • Deborah B. Hobson
    • 3
    • 8
  • Dauryne L. Shaffer
    • 8
  • Jonathan K. Aboagye
    • 8
  • Peter J. Pronovost
    • 3
    • 4
    • 9
  • Elliott R. Haut
    • 3
    • 4
    • 8
    • 9
    • 10
  1. 1.Russell H. Morgan Department of Radiology and Radiological ScienceThe Johns Hopkins University School of MedicineBaltimoreUSA
  2. 2.Division of Health Sciences InformaticsThe Johns Hopkins University School of MedicineBaltimoreUSA
  3. 3.The Armstrong Institute for Patient Safety and QualityJohns Hopkins MedicineBaltimoreUSA
  4. 4.Department of Health Policy and ManagementJohns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public HealthBaltimoreUSA
  5. 5.Department of MedicineThe Johns Hopkins University School of MedicineBaltimoreUSA
  6. 6.Department of PathologyThe Johns Hopkins University School of MedicineBaltimoreUSA
  7. 7.Department of PharmacyThe Johns Hopkins HospitalBaltimoreUSA
  8. 8.Department of SurgeryThe Johns Hopkins University School of MedicineBaltimoreUSA
  9. 9.Department of Anesthesiology & Critical Care MedicineThe Johns Hopkins University School of MedicineBaltimoreUSA
  10. 10.Department of Emergency MedicineThe Johns Hopkins University School of MedicineBaltimoreUSA

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