Journal of General Internal Medicine

, Volume 32, Issue 1, pp 93–100

Recommendations for Providers on Person-Centered Approaches to Assess and Improve Medication Adherence

  • Hayden B. Bosworth
  • Stephen P. Fortmann
  • Jennifer Kuntz
  • Leah L. Zullig
  • Phil Mendys
  • Monika Safford
  • Shobha Phansalkar
  • Tracy Wang
  • Maureen H. Rumptz
Review Paper

DOI: 10.1007/s11606-016-3851-7

Cite this article as:
Bosworth, H.B., Fortmann, S.P., Kuntz, J. et al. J GEN INTERN MED (2017) 32: 93. doi:10.1007/s11606-016-3851-7

Abstract

Medication non-adherence is a significant clinical challenge that adversely affects psychosocial factors, costs, and outcomes that are shared by patients, family members, providers, healthcare systems, payers, and society. Patient-centered care (i.e., involving patients and their families in planning their health care) is increasingly emphasized as a promising approach for improving medication adherence, but clinician education around what this might look like in a busy primary care environment is lacking. We use a case study to demonstrate key skills such as motivational interviewing, counseling, and shared decision-making for clinicians interested in providing patient-centered care in efforts to improve medication adherence. Such patient-centered approaches hold considerable promise for addressing the high rates of non-adherence to medications for chronic conditions.

KEY WORDS

person-centered approach shared decision-making nonadherence clinician education motivational interviewing 

Copyright information

© Society of General Internal Medicine 2016

Authors and Affiliations

  • Hayden B. Bosworth
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
  • Stephen P. Fortmann
    • 4
  • Jennifer Kuntz
    • 4
  • Leah L. Zullig
    • 1
    • 3
  • Phil Mendys
    • 5
    • 6
  • Monika Safford
    • 7
  • Shobha Phansalkar
    • 8
    • 9
  • Tracy Wang
    • 10
  • Maureen H. Rumptz
    • 4
  1. 1.Center for Health Services Research in Primary CareDurham Veterans Affairs Medical CenterDurhamUSA
  2. 2.School of Nursing and Department of PsychiatryDuke University Medical CenterDurhamUSA
  3. 3.Department of MedicineDuke University Medical CenterDurhamUSA
  4. 4.Kaiser Permanente Center for Health ResearchPortlandUSA
  5. 5.Pfizer Inc. Medical AffairsNew YorkUSA
  6. 6.UNC Division of CardiologyChapel HillUSA
  7. 7.Department of MedicineUniversity of Alabama at BirminghamBirminghamUSA
  8. 8.Innovation and Clinical Informatics, Clinical Drug Information division of Wolters Kluwer Health, Department of General MedicineBrigham and Women’s Hospital and Harvard Medical SchoolBostonUSA
  9. 9.Partners HealthcareBostonUSA
  10. 10.Division of Cardiology, Department of MedicineDuke University Medical CenterDurhamUSA

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