Journal of General Internal Medicine

, Volume 25, Supplement 2, pp 160–163 | Cite as

A Strategy for Improving Health Disparities Education in Medicine

  • Paula T. Ross
  • Crystal Wiley Cené
  • Jada Bussey-Jones
  • Arleen F. Brown
  • Dionne Blackman
  • Alicia Fernández
  • Leonor Fernández
  • Susan B. Glick
  • Carol R. Horowitz
  • Elizabeth A. Jacobs
  • Monica E. Peek
  • LuAnn Wilkerson
  • Monica L. Lypson
Innovations in Education

Abstract

Introduction

A health disparities curriculum that uses evidence-based knowledge rooted in pedagogic theory is needed to educate health care providers to meet the needs of an increasingly diverse U.S. population.

Description

The Health Disparities Education: Beyond Cultural Competency Precourse, along with its accompanying Train the Trainer Guide: Health Disparities Education (2008), developed by the Society of General Internal Medicine (SGIM) Disparities Task Force (DTF), is a comprehensive tool to facilitate developing, implementing and evaluating health disparities education. The curriculum includes five modules highlighting several fundamental concepts in health disparities, suggestions for teaching about health disparities in a wide range of settings and strategies for curriculum evaluation. The modules are Disparities Foundations, Teaching Disparities in the Clinical Setting, Disparities Beyond the Clinical Setting, Teaching about Disparities Through Community Involvement, and Curriculum Evaluation.

Evaluation

All five modules were delivered as a precourse at the 31st Annual SGIM Annual Meeting in Pittsburgh, PA and received the “Best Precourse Award”. This award is given to the most highly rated precourse based on participant evaluations. The modules have also been adapted into a web-based guide that has been downloaded at least 59 times.

Conclusion

Ultimately, the modules are designed to develop a professional commitment to eliminating racial and ethnic disparities in health care quality, promote an understanding of the role of health care providers in reducing health care disparities through comprehensive education and training, and provide a framework with which providers can address the causes of disparities in various educational settings.

Key Words

health disparities medical education faculty development 

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Copyright information

© Society of General Internal Medicine 2010

Authors and Affiliations

  • Paula T. Ross
    • 1
  • Crystal Wiley Cené
    • 2
  • Jada Bussey-Jones
    • 3
  • Arleen F. Brown
    • 4
  • Dionne Blackman
    • 5
  • Alicia Fernández
    • 6
  • Leonor Fernández
    • 7
  • Susan B. Glick
    • 5
  • Carol R. Horowitz
    • 8
  • Elizabeth A. Jacobs
    • 9
  • Monica E. Peek
    • 5
  • LuAnn Wilkerson
    • 4
  • Monica L. Lypson
    • 1
  1. 1.University of MichiganAnn ArborUSA
  2. 2.University of North CarolinaChapel HillUSA
  3. 3.Emory University School of MedicineAtlantaUSA
  4. 4.David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLALos AngelesUSA
  5. 5.University of ChicagoChicagoUSA
  6. 6.University of California San FranciscoSan FranciscoUSA
  7. 7.Beth Israel Deconess Hospital, Harvard UniversityBostonUSA
  8. 8.Mount Sinai School of MedicineNew YorkUSA
  9. 9.Stroger Cook County Hospital, Rush University Medical CenterChicagoUSA

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