Journal of General Internal Medicine

, Volume 23, Issue 7, pp 1006–1009 | Cite as

Working with Patients with Alcohol Problems: A Controlled Trial of the Impact of a Rich Media Web Module on Medical Student Performance

  • Joshua D. Lee
  • Marc Triola
  • Colleen Gillespie
  • Marc N. Gourevitch
  • Kathleen Hanley
  • Andrea Truncali
  • Sondra Zabar
  • Adina Kalet
Innovations in Education

Abstract

INTRODUCTION/AIMS

We designed an interactive web module to improve medical student competence in screening and interventions for hazardous drinking. We assessed its impact on performance with a standardized patient (SP) vs. traditional lecture.

SETTING

First year medical school curriculum.

PROGRAM DESCRIPTION

The web module included pre/posttests, Flash©, and text didactics. It centered on videos of two alcohol cases, each contrasting a novice with an experienced physician interviewer. The learner free-text critiqued each clip then reviewed expert analysis.

PROGRAM EVALUATION

First year medical students conveniently assigned to voluntarily complete a web module (N = 82) or lecture (N = 81) were rated by a SP in a later alcohol case. Participation trended higher (82% vs. 72%, p < .07) among web students, with an additional 4 lecture-assigned students crossing to the web module. The web group had higher mean scores on scales of individual components of brief intervention (assessment and decisional balance) and a brief intervention composite score (1–13 pt.; 9 vs. 7.8, p < .02) and self-reported as better prepared for the SP case.

CONCLUSIONS

A web module for alcohol use interview skills reached a greater proportion of voluntary learners and was associated with equivalent overall performance scores and higher brief intervention skills scores on a standardized patient encounter.

KEY WORDS

health education alcohol use disorders/alcoholism Internet multimedia learning 

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Copyright information

© Society of General Internal Medicine 2008

Authors and Affiliations

  • Joshua D. Lee
    • 1
  • Marc Triola
    • 1
  • Colleen Gillespie
    • 1
  • Marc N. Gourevitch
    • 1
  • Kathleen Hanley
    • 1
  • Andrea Truncali
    • 1
  • Sondra Zabar
    • 1
  • Adina Kalet
    • 1
  1. 1.Division of General Internal MedicineNew York University School of MedicineNew YorkUSA

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