Journal of General Internal Medicine

, Volume 22, Issue 12, pp 1661–1667

Association Between Antihypertensive Medication Use and Non-cardiovascular Outcomes in Older Men

  • Joseph V. Agostini
  • Mary E. Tinetti
  • Ling Han
  • Peter Peduzzi
  • JoAnne M. Foody
  • John Concato
Original Article

DOI: 10.1007/s11606-007-0388-9

Cite this article as:
Agostini, J.V., Tinetti, M.E., Han, L. et al. J GEN INTERN MED (2007) 22: 1661. doi:10.1007/s11606-007-0388-9

Abstract

Background

Antihypertensive drugs are prescribed commonly in older adults for their beneficial cardiovascular and cerebrovascular effects, but few studies have assessed antihypertensive drugs’ adverse effects on non-cardiovascular outcomes in routine clinical practice.

Objective

To evaluate, among older adults, the association between antihypertensive medication use and physical performance, cognition, and mood.

Design and Setting

Prospective cohort study in a Veterans Affairs primary care clinic, with patients enrolled in 2000–2001 and assessed for medication use, comorbidities, health behaviors, and other characteristics; and followed-up 1 year later.

Participants

544 community-dwelling hypertensive men over age 65 years.

Measurements

Timed chair stands; Trail Making Test part B; and Centers for Epidemiologic Studies Depression (CES-D) scores.

Results

Participants had a mean age of 74.4 ± 5.2 years and took a mean of 2.3 ± 1.2 antihypertensive medications at baseline. After adjustment for age, comorbidities, level of blood pressure, and other confounders, each 1-unit increase in antihypertensive medication “intensity” was associated with a 0.11-second (95% confidence interval, 0.05–0.16) increase in the time required to complete the timed chair stands. No significant relationship was found between antihypertensive medication intensity and outcomes for Trail Making B or CES-D scores.

Conclusions

A higher cumulative exposure to antihypertensive medications in community-living older men was associated with adverse effects on physical performance, but not on the cognitive or depression measures available in this study. Clinicians should consider non-cardiovascular related adverse effects when treating older males taking multiple antihypertensive medications.

KEY WORDS

aged drugs antihypertensives adverse effects polypharmacy ambulatory care 

Copyright information

© Society of General Internal Medicine 2007

Authors and Affiliations

  • Joseph V. Agostini
    • 1
    • 2
  • Mary E. Tinetti
    • 2
    • 3
  • Ling Han
    • 2
  • Peter Peduzzi
    • 3
    • 4
  • JoAnne M. Foody
    • 2
  • John Concato
    • 1
    • 2
  1. 1.Clinical Epidemiology Research Center 151BVA Connecticut Healthcare SystemWest HavenUSA
  2. 2.Department of Internal MedicineYale University School of MedicineNew HavenUSA
  3. 3.Department of Epidemiology and Public HealthYale University School of MedicineNew HavenUSA
  4. 4.VA Cooperative Studies Program Coordinating CenterVA Connecticut Healthcare SystemWest HavenUSA

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