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Journal of Gastrointestinal Surgery

, Volume 21, Issue 1, pp 164–174 | Cite as

Preoperative Therapy and Pancreatoduodenectomy for Pancreatic Ductal Adenocarcinoma: a 25-Year Single-Institution Experience

  • Jordan M. Cloyd
  • Matthew H. G. Katz
  • Laura Prakash
  • Gauri R. Varadhachary
  • Robert A. Wolff
  • Rachna T. Shroff
  • Milind Javle
  • David Fogelman
  • Michael Overman
  • Christopher H. Crane
  • Eugene J. Koay
  • Prajnan Das
  • Sunil Krishnan
  • Bruce D. Minsky
  • Jeffrey H. Lee
  • Manoop S. Bhutani
  • Brian Weston
  • William Ross
  • Priya Bhosale
  • Eric P. Tamm
  • Huamin Wang
  • Anirban Maitra
  • Michael P. Kim
  • Thomas A. Aloia
  • Jean-Nicholas Vauthey
  • Jason B. Fleming
  • James L. Abbruzzese
  • Peter W. T. Pisters
  • Douglas B. Evans
  • Jeffrey E. Lee
2016 SSAT Plenary Presentation

Abstract

Background

The purpose of this study was to evaluate a single-institution experience with delivery of preoperative therapy to patients with pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) prior to pancreatoduodenectomy (PD).

Methods

Consecutive patients (622) with PDAC who underwent PD following chemotherapy and/or chemoradiation between 1990 and 2014 were retrospectively reviewed. Preoperative treatment regimens, clinicopathologic characteristics, operative details, and long-term outcomes in four successive time periods (1990–1999, 2000–2004, 2005–2009, 2010–2014) were evaluated and compared.

Results

The average number of patients per year who underwent PD following preoperative therapy as well as the proportion of operations performed for borderline resectable and locally advanced (BR/LA) tumors increased over time. The use of induction systemic chemotherapy, as well as postoperative adjuvant chemotherapy, also increased over time. Throughout the study period, the mean EBL decreased while R0 margin rates and vascular resection rates increased overall. Despite the increase in BR/LA resections, locoregional recurrence (LR) rates remained similar over time, and overall survival (OS) improved significantly (median 24.1, 28.1, 37.3, 43.4 months, respectively, p < 0.0001).

Conclusions

Despite increases in case complexity, relatively low rates of LR have been maintained while significant improvements in OS have been observed. Further improvements in patient outcomes will likely require disruptive advances in systemic therapy.

Keywords

Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma Neoadjuvant therapy Pancreatectomy Pancreatoduodenectomy 

Notes

Acknowledgments

The authors would like to thank the many courageous patients and families who have formed the basis of our experience and reinforce the importance of multidisciplinary care.

This study was supported by the NIH/NCI under award number P30CA016672 and used the Clinical Trials Support Resource.

Compliance with Ethical Standards

Author Contributions

All authors made substantial contributions to the conception or design of the work; or the acquisition, analysis, or interpretation of data for the work; drafting the work or revising it critically for important intellectual content; final approval of the version to be published; and agreement to be accountable for all aspects of the work in ensuring that questions related to the accuracy or integrity of any part of the work are appropriately investigated and resolved.

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Copyright information

© The Society for Surgery of the Alimentary Tract 2016

Authors and Affiliations

  • Jordan M. Cloyd
    • 1
  • Matthew H. G. Katz
    • 1
  • Laura Prakash
    • 1
  • Gauri R. Varadhachary
    • 2
  • Robert A. Wolff
    • 2
  • Rachna T. Shroff
    • 2
  • Milind Javle
    • 2
  • David Fogelman
    • 2
  • Michael Overman
    • 2
  • Christopher H. Crane
    • 3
  • Eugene J. Koay
    • 3
  • Prajnan Das
    • 3
  • Sunil Krishnan
    • 3
  • Bruce D. Minsky
    • 3
  • Jeffrey H. Lee
    • 4
  • Manoop S. Bhutani
    • 4
  • Brian Weston
    • 4
  • William Ross
    • 4
  • Priya Bhosale
    • 5
  • Eric P. Tamm
    • 5
  • Huamin Wang
    • 6
  • Anirban Maitra
    • 6
  • Michael P. Kim
    • 1
  • Thomas A. Aloia
    • 1
  • Jean-Nicholas Vauthey
    • 1
  • Jason B. Fleming
    • 1
  • James L. Abbruzzese
    • 7
  • Peter W. T. Pisters
    • 8
  • Douglas B. Evans
    • 9
  • Jeffrey E. Lee
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Surgical OncologyUniversity of Texas MD Anderson Cancer CenterHoustonUSA
  2. 2.Department of Medical OncologyUniversity of Texas MD Anderson Cancer CenterHoustonUSA
  3. 3.Department of Radiation OncologyUniversity of Texas MD Anderson Cancer CenterHoustonUSA
  4. 4.Department of GasteroenterologyUniversity of Texas MD Anderson Cancer CenterHoustonUSA
  5. 5.Department of Diagnostic ImagingUniversity of Texas MD Anderson Cancer CenterHoustonUSA
  6. 6.Department of PathologyUniversity of Texas MD Anderson Cancer CenterHoustonUSA
  7. 7.Division of Medical Oncology, Department of MedicineDuke UniversityDurhamUSA
  8. 8.University Health NetworkTorontoCanada
  9. 9.Division of Surgical Oncology, Department of SurgeryThe Medical College of WisconsinMilwaukeeUSA

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