Journal of Gastrointestinal Surgery

, Volume 17, Issue 7, pp 1274–1282

Evolution of Image-Guided Liver Surgery: Transition from Open to Laparoscopic Procedures

  • T. Peter Kingham
  • Shiva Jayaraman
  • Logan W. Clements
  • Michael A. Scherer
  • James D. Stefansic
  • William R. Jarnagin
Original Article

Abstract

Introduction

Indications for liver surgery to treat primary and secondary hepatic malignancies are broadening. Utilizing data from B-mode or 2-D intraoperative ultrasound, it is often challenging to replicate the findings from preoperative CT or MRI scans. Additional data from more recently developed image-guidance technology, which registers preoperative axial imaging to a 3-D real-time model, may be used to improve operative planning, locate difficult to find hepatic tumors, and guide ablations.

Methods

Laparoscopic liver procedures are often more challenging than their open counterparts. Image-guidance technology can assist in overcoming some of the obstacles to minimally invasive liver procedures by enhancing ultrasound findings and ablation guidance. This manuscript describes a protocol that evaluated an open image-guidance system, and a subsequent protocol that directly compared, for validation, a laparoscopic with an open image-guidance system. Both protocols were limited to ablations within the liver.

Discussion

The laparoscopic image-guidance system successfully creates a 3-D model at both 7 and 14 mm Hg that is similar to the open 3-D model. Ultimately, improving intraoperative image guidance can help expand the ability to perform both laparoscopic and open liver surgeries.

Keywords

Image-guided surgery Liver surgery Minimally invasive 

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Copyright information

© The Society for Surgery of the Alimentary Tract 2013

Authors and Affiliations

  • T. Peter Kingham
    • 1
    • 4
  • Shiva Jayaraman
    • 2
  • Logan W. Clements
    • 3
  • Michael A. Scherer
    • 3
  • James D. Stefansic
    • 3
  • William R. Jarnagin
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Surgery, Hepatopancreatobiliary ServiceMemorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer CenterNew YorkUSA
  2. 2.Department of SurgeryUniversity of Toronto, St. Joseph’s Health CentreTorontoCanada
  3. 3.Pathfinder Technologies, Inc.NashvilleUSA
  4. 4.Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer CenterNew YorkUSA

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