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ω-3PUFAs prevent MK-801-induced cognitive impairment in schizophrenic rats via the CREB/BDNF/TrkB pathway

  • Mao-sheng Fang (房茂胜)
  • Xing Li (李 行)
  • Hong Qian (钱 红)
  • Kuan Zeng (曾 宽)
  • Meng Ye (叶 萌)
  • Yong-jie Zhou (周勇杰)
  • Hui Li (李 辉)
  • Xiao-chuan Wang (王小川)
  • Yi Li (李 毅)
Article

Summary

This study was to determine the protective effect of ω-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (ω-3PUFAs) on MK-801-induced cognitive impairment in schizophrenia (SZ) rats and the underlying mechanism. A rat model of schizophrenia was induced by MK-801. The cognitive function of rats was assessed using a Morris water maze. The number of hippocampal neurons was measured by Nissl staining. The expression of CREB, p-CREB, BDNF, TrkB, p-TrkB, AKT, p-AKT, ERK, and p-ERK in the hippocampus of rats was detected by Western blotting. The results showed that ω-3PUFAs attenuated MK-801-induced cognitive impairment and hippocampal neurons loss, reversed the injury of the CREB/BDNF/TrkB pathway induced by MK-801, and antagonized MK-801-induced down-regulation of p-AKT and p-ERK in the hippocampus of rats. In conclusion, ω-3PUFAs enhances the CREB/BDNF/TrkB pathway by activating ERK and AKT, thereby increasing the synaptic plasticity and decreasing neuron loss, and antagonizing MK-801-induced cognitive impairment in schizophrenic rats.

Key words

schizophrenia MK-801 ω-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids cognition impairment CREB/BDNF/TrkB pathway 

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Copyright information

© Huazhong University of Science and Technology and Springer-Verlag GmbH Germany 2017

Authors and Affiliations

  • Mao-sheng Fang (房茂胜)
    • 1
  • Xing Li (李 行)
    • 2
  • Hong Qian (钱 红)
    • 1
  • Kuan Zeng (曾 宽)
    • 1
    • 2
  • Meng Ye (叶 萌)
    • 1
  • Yong-jie Zhou (周勇杰)
    • 1
  • Hui Li (李 辉)
    • 1
  • Xiao-chuan Wang (王小川)
    • 2
    • 3
  • Yi Li (李 毅)
    • 1
  1. 1.Wuhan Mental Health CenterWuhanChina
  2. 2.Department of Pathophysiology, School of Basic Medicine and the Collaborative Innovation Center for Brain Science, Key Laboratory of Ministry of Education of China for Neurological Disorders, Tongji Medical CollegeHuazhong University of Science and TechnologyWuhanChina
  3. 3.Co-innovation Center of NeuroregenerationNantongChina

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