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Significance of cyclooxygenase-2 elevation in middle cerebral artery for patients with hemorrhagic moyamoya disease

  • Jian-jian Zhang (章剑剑)
  • Zhong-wei Xiong (熊忠伟)
  • Sheng Wang (王 胜)
  • Shou-jia Sun (孙守家)
  • Hao Wang (王 昊)
  • Xiao-lin Wu (吴小林)
  • Long Wang (王 龙)
  • Hua-qiu Zhang (张华楸)
  • Chao You (游 超)
  • Yu Wang (王 煜)
  • Jin-cao Chen (陈劲草)Email author
Article
  • 62 Downloads

Summary

The etiology and pathogenesis of moyamoya disease (MMD) remain elusive. Some inflammatory proteins, such as cyclooxygenase (COX)-2, are believed to be implicated in the development of MMD. So far, the relationship between COX-2 and MMD is poorly understood and reports on the intracranial vessels of MMD patients are scanty. In this study, tiny pieces of middle cerebral artery (MCA) and superficial temporal artery (STA) from 13 MMD patients were surgically harvested. The MCA and STA samples from 5 control patients were also collected by using the same technique. The expression of COX-2 was immunohistochemically detected and the average absorbance (A) of positively-stained areas was measured. High-level COX-2 expression was found in all layers of the MCA samples from all 5 hemorrhagic MMD patients, while positive but weak expression of COX-2 was observed only in the endothelial layer of the MCA samples from most ischemic MMD patients (6/8, 75%). The average A values of COX-2 in the hemorrhagic MMD patients were substantially higher than those in their ischemic counterparts (t=4.632, P=0.001). There was no significant difference in the COX-2 expression among the “gender” groups, or “radiographic grade” groups, or “lesion location” groups (P>0.05 for all). The COX-2 expression was detected neither in the MCA samples from the controls nor in all STA specimens. Our results suggested that COX-2 was up-regulated in the MCA of MMD patients, especially in hemorrhagic MMD patients. We are led to speculate that COX-2 may be involved in the pathogenesis of MMD and even contribute to the hemorrhagic stroke of MMD patients.

Key words

moyamoya disease middle cerebral artery COX-2 inflammation hemorrhage 

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Copyright information

© Huazhong University of Science and Technology and Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2016

Authors and Affiliations

  • Jian-jian Zhang (章剑剑)
    • 1
    • 2
  • Zhong-wei Xiong (熊忠伟)
    • 1
    • 2
  • Sheng Wang (王 胜)
    • 2
  • Shou-jia Sun (孙守家)
    • 2
  • Hao Wang (王 昊)
    • 2
  • Xiao-lin Wu (吴小林)
    • 2
  • Long Wang (王 龙)
    • 2
  • Hua-qiu Zhang (张华楸)
    • 2
  • Chao You (游 超)
    • 2
  • Yu Wang (王 煜)
    • 2
  • Jin-cao Chen (陈劲草)
    • 1
    • 2
    Email author
  1. 1.Department of NeurosurgeryZhongnan Hospital of Wuhan UniversityWuhanChina
  2. 2.Department of Neurosurgery, Tongji Hospital, Tongji Medical CollegeHuazhong University of Science and TechnologyWuhanChina

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