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Role of DOR-β-arrestin1-Bcl2 signal transduction pathway and intervention effects of oxymatrine in ulcerative colitis

  • Pi-qi Zhou (周丕琪)
  • Heng Fan (范 恒)
  • Hui Hu (胡 慧)
  • Qing Tang (唐 庆)
  • Xing-xing Liu (刘星星)
  • Li-juan Zhang (张丽娟)
  • Min Zhong (钟 敏)
  • Zhe-xing Shou (寿折星)
Article

Summary

This study was aimed to investigate the role of the delta-opioid receptor (DOR)-β-arrestin1-Bcl-2 signal transduction pathway in the pathogenesis of ulcerative colitis (UC) and the intervention effects of oxymatrine on UC. Forty Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into normal group, model group, oxymatrine-treated group and mesalazine-treated group (n=10 each) at random. The rat UC model was established by intra-colonic injection of trinitrobenzene sulfonic acid in the model group and two treatment groups. The rats in oxymatrine-treated group were subjected to intramuscular injection of oxymatrine [63 mg/(kg·day)] for 15 days, and those in mesalazine-treated group given mesalazine solution [0.5 g/(kg·day)] by gastric lavage for the same days. Animals in normal group and model group were administered 3 mL water by gastric lavage for 15 days. On the 16th day, after fasting for 24 h, the rats were sacrificed for the removal of colon tissues. The expression levels of DOR, β-arrestin1 and Bcl-2 were determined in colon tissues by immunohistochemistry and real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), respectively. It was found that the expression levels of DOR, β-arrestin1 and Bcl-2 protein and mRNA were significantly increased in the model group as compared with the other groups (P<0.05). They were conspicuously decreased in both mesalazine-treated and oxymatrine-treated groups in contrast to the model group (P<0.05). No statistically significant difference was noted in these indices between mesalazine- and oxymatrinetreated groups (P>0.05). This study indicated that the DOR-β-arrestin1-Bcl-2 signal transduction pathway may participate in the pathogenesis of UC. Moreover, oxymatrine can attenuate the development of UC by regulating the DOR-β-arrestin1-Bcl-2 signal transduction pathway.

Key words

ulcerative colitis delta-opioid receptor beta-arrestin1 Bcl-2 oxymatrine 

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Copyright information

© Huazhong University of Science and Technology and Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2014

Authors and Affiliations

  • Pi-qi Zhou (周丕琪)
    • 1
  • Heng Fan (范 恒)
    • 1
  • Hui Hu (胡 慧)
    • 1
  • Qing Tang (唐 庆)
    • 1
  • Xing-xing Liu (刘星星)
    • 1
  • Li-juan Zhang (张丽娟)
    • 1
  • Min Zhong (钟 敏)
    • 1
  • Zhe-xing Shou (寿折星)
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Integrated Chinese and Western Medicine, Union Hospital, Tongji Medical CollegeHuazhong University of Science and TechnologyWuhanChina

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