Characterization of acute renal allograft rejection by human serum proteomic analysis

  • Ying Gao (高 英)
  • Ke Wu (吴 轲)
  • Yi Xu (徐 逸)
  • Hongmin Zhou (周鸿敏)
  • Wentao He (何文涛)
  • Weina Zhang (张维娜)
  • Lanjun Cai (蔡兰军)
  • Xingguang Lin (林星光)
  • Zemin Fang (方泽民)
  • Zhenlong Luo (雒真龙)
  • Hui Guo (郭 晖)
  • Zhonghua Chen (陈忠华)
Article
  • 65 Downloads

Summary

To identify acute renal allograft rejection biomarkers in human serum, two-dimensional differential in-gel electrophoresis (2-D DIGE) and reversed phase high-performance liquid chromatography (RP-HPLC) followed by electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) were used. Serum samples from renal allograft patients and normal volunteers were divided into three groups: acute rejection (AR), stable renal function (SRF) and normal volunteer (N). Serum samples were firstly processed using Multiple Affinity Removal Column to selectively remove the highest abundance proteins. Differentially expressed proteins were analyzed using 2-D DIGE. These differential protein spots were excised, digested by trypsin, and identified by RP-HPLC-ESI/MS. Twenty-two differentially expressed proteins were identified in serum from AR group. These proteins included complement C9 precursor, apolipoprotein A-IV precursor, vitamin D-binding protein precursor, beta-2-glycoprotein 1 precursor, etc. Vitamin D-binding protein, one of these proteins, was confirmed by ELISA in the independent set of serum samples. In conclusion, the differentially expressed proteins as serum biomarker candidates may provide the basis of acute rejection noninvasive diagnosis. Confirmed vitamin D-binding protein may be one of serum biomarkers of acute rejection. Furthermore, it may provide great insights into understanding the mechanisms and potential treatment strategy of acute rejection.

Key words

acute rejection two-dimensional differential in-gel electrophoresis reversed phase high-performance liquid chromatography electrospray ionization mass spectrometry ELISA serum 

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Copyright information

© Huazhong University of Science and Technology and Springer Berlin Heidelberg 2009

Authors and Affiliations

  • Ying Gao (高 英)
    • 1
  • Ke Wu (吴 轲)
    • 1
  • Yi Xu (徐 逸)
    • 1
  • Hongmin Zhou (周鸿敏)
    • 1
  • Wentao He (何文涛)
    • 1
  • Weina Zhang (张维娜)
    • 1
  • Lanjun Cai (蔡兰军)
    • 1
  • Xingguang Lin (林星光)
    • 1
  • Zemin Fang (方泽民)
    • 1
  • Zhenlong Luo (雒真龙)
    • 1
  • Hui Guo (郭 晖)
    • 1
  • Zhonghua Chen (陈忠华)
    • 1
  1. 1.Institute of Organ Transplantation, Tongji Hospital, Tongji Medical CollegeHuazhong University of Science and Technology, Key Laboratory of Organ Transplantation, Ministry of Education, Ministry of HealthWuhanChina

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