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Analysis of Air Voids Evolution in Cement Pastes Admixed with Non-ionic Cellulose Ethers

  • Zhihua Ou (欧志华)
  • Yi Xiao
  • Jingjing Wang (王菁菁)
  • Baoguo Ma
  • Longmin Jiang
  • Shouwei Jian
Cementitious Materials
  • 2 Downloads

Abstract

Four cellulose ethers (CEs) were compared for their effects on the pore structure of cement paste using mercury intrusion porosimetry. The experimental results show that the total pore volume and porosity of cement pastes containing the four cellulose ethers are significantly higher than that of the pure cement pastes and the total pore volume and porosity of cement pastes containing HEC (hydroxyethyl cellulose ether) or low viscosity cellulose ethers are low in four CEs. By changing the surface tension and viscosity of liquid phase and the strengthening of liquid film between air voids in cement pastes, CEs affect the formation, diameter evolution and upward movement of air voids and the pore structure of hardening cement paste. For the four CEs, the pore volume of cement pastes containing HEC or low viscosity cellulose ethers is higher with the diameter of 30–70 nm while lower with the diameter larger than 70 nm. CEs affect the pore structure of cement paste mainly through their effects on the evolvement of the small air voids into bigger ones when the pore diameter is below 70 nm and their effects on the entrainment and stabilization of air voids when the pore diameter is above 70 nm.

Key words

cellulose ethers cement pastes pore structure air voids diameter evolution 

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Copyright information

© Wuhan University of Technology and Springer-Verlag GmbH Germany, part of Springer Nature 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • Zhihua Ou (欧志华)
    • 1
    • 2
  • Yi Xiao
    • 1
  • Jingjing Wang (王菁菁)
    • 1
  • Baoguo Ma
    • 2
  • Longmin Jiang
    • 1
  • Shouwei Jian
    • 2
  1. 1.School of Civil EngineeringHunan University of TechnologyZhuzhouChina
  2. 2.State Key Laboratory of Silicate Materials for ArchitecturesWuhan University of TechnologyWuhanChina

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