HAND

, Volume 8, Issue 3, pp 320–323

Dorsal radiocarpal dislocation in a patient with Goldenhar syndrome: case report

  • Johnathan A. Bernard
  • Andres O’Daly
  • Dawn M. LaPorte
Case Reports
  • 124 Downloads

Abstract

Background

Fracture–dislocations of the carpus are rare, generally occurring after high-energy trauma. Goldenhar syndrome is among a group of genetic abnormalities associated with radial limb defects. We present a case of a dorsal radiocarpal dislocation in a patient with Goldenhar syndrome after a low-energy fall. To our knowledge, there has been no previous report of radiocarpal dislocation in the setting of Goldenhar syndrome.

Methods

This patient with Goldenhar syndrome had a dorsal radiocarpal dislocation in the setting of an absent scaphoid and dysplastic distal radius. A computed tomography scan, recognized as a useful modality to evaluate the wrist and scaphoid, was used to rule out any other osseous trauma or avulsion fractures.

Results

Closed reduction and 6 weeks of immobilization resulted in a successful treatment.

Conclusions

The incidence of radiocarpal dislocations in patients with Goldenhar syndrome and the appropriate long-term treatment for patients with Goldenhar syndrome with radiocarpal dislocations require further investigation.

Keywords

Dorsal radiocarpal dislocation Dysplastic distal radius Goldenhar Scaphoid aplasia 

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Copyright information

© American Association for Hand Surgery 2013

Authors and Affiliations

  • Johnathan A. Bernard
    • 1
  • Andres O’Daly
    • 1
  • Dawn M. LaPorte
    • 1
    • 2
  1. 1.Division of Hand and Upper Extremity Surgery, Department of Orthopaedic SurgeryThe Johns Hopkins UniversityBaltimoreUSA
  2. 2.c/o Elaine P. Henze, BJ, ELS, Medical Editor and Director, Editorial Services, Department of Orthopaedic SurgeryThe Johns Hopkins University/Johns Hopkins Bayview Medical CenterBaltimoreUSA

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