Potato Research

, Volume 57, Issue 3–4, pp 215–224 | Cite as

The Contribution of the Solanaceae Coordinated Agricultural Project to Potato Breeding

  • D. Douches
  • C. N. Hirsch
  • N. C. Manrique-Carpintero
  • A. N. Massa
  • J. Coombs
  • M. Hardigan
  • D. Bisognin
  • W. De Jong
  • C. R. Buell
Article

Abstract

Potato variety development in the USA involves extensive interaction between public sector scientists and state and national grower organizations to test and commercialize new varieties. Historically, breeding and germplasm development efforts have relied upon phenotypic evaluations to select and advance germplasm. The goal of the US Department of Agriculture (USDA)-funded Solanaceae Coordinated Agricultural Project (SolCAP) was to translate genomic resources into tools that can be used by breeders and geneticists. A major outcome of this project was the development of a genome-wide single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) array that can be used to evaluate elite potato breeding germplasm. This array was utilized to genotype numerous biparental tetraploid and diploid populations, a diversity panel, and a core collection of Solanum species. The SNP array provides a marker density sufficient to generate genetic maps to identify numerous quantitative trait loci (QTLs) for agronomic, quality, and disease resistance traits. Many new diploid and tetraploid genetic maps have been constructed and used to identify numerous QTLs for important traits. We used SNP markers to assess relationships among germplasm, fingerprint varieties, and identify candidate genes. The Infinium 8303 Potato Array provides a common set of SNP markers that can reliably be used for mapping, germplasm assessment, and fingerprinting. This array has also been a useful tool to advance our understanding of the potato genome. Furthermore, breeders are mapping QTLs across numerous populations that will expand our understanding of economically important traits and lead to marker-assisted selection and breeding, and ultimately improved varieties.

Keywords

Breeding Genetic maps Quantitative trait loci Single nucleotide polymorphism Translational genomics 

References

  1. Bae J, Halterman D, Jansky S (2008) Development of a molecular marker associated with Verticillium wilt resistance in diploid interspecific potato hybrids. Mol Breed 22:61–69. doi:10.1007/S11032-008-9156-8 CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  2. Colton LM, Groza HI, Wielgus SM, Jiang JM (2006) Marker-assisted selection for the broad-spectrum potato late blight resistance conferred by gene RB derived from a wild potato species. Crop Sci 46:589–594. doi:10.2135/Cropsci2005.0112
  3. Felcher KJ et al (2012) Integration of two diploid potato linkage maps with the potato genome sequence. PLoS One 7:e36347. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0036347
  4. Hackett CA, McLean K, Bryan GJ (2013) Linkage analysis and QTL Mapping using SNP dosage data in a tetraploid potato mapping population. PLoS One 8:e63939. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0063939 CrossRefPubMedCentralPubMedGoogle Scholar
  5. Hamilton JP et al (2011) Single nucleotide polymorphism discovery in elite north american potato germplasm. BMC Genomics 12:302. doi:10.1186/1471-2164-12-302
  6. Hardigan M, Bamberg J, Buell CR, Douches D (2014) Taxonomy and genetic differentiation among wild and cultivated germplasm of Solanum sect. Petota. Plant Genome. Accepted for publicationGoogle Scholar
  7. Hirsch CN et al (2013) Retrospective view of North American potato (Solanum tuberosum L.) breeding in the 20th and 21st centuries. G3 3:1003–1013. doi:10.1534/G3.113.005595
  8. Kasai K, Morikawa Y, Sorri VA, Valkonen JP, Gebhardt C, Watanabe KN (2000) Development of SCAR markers to the PVY resistance gene Ryadg based on a common feature of plant disease resistance genes. Genome 43:1–8CrossRefPubMedGoogle Scholar
  9. Kloosterman B et al (2013) Naturally occurring allele diversity allows potato cultivation in northern latitudes. Nature 495:246–250. doi:10.1038/Nature11912
  10. USDA (2013) Potatoes 2012 summary. United States Department of Agriculture-USDA, National Agricultural Statistics Service-NASSGoogle Scholar
  11. Van Deynze A, Douches D, De Jong W, Francis D (2007) Summary of Solanaceae coordinating meetings. Acta Hort 745:533–536Google Scholar
  12. Van Os H et al (2006) Construction of a 10,000-marker ultradense genetic recombination map of potato: providing a framework for accelerated gene isolation and a genomewide physical map. Genetics 173:1075–1087. doi:10.1534/genetics.106.055871 CrossRefPubMedCentralPubMedGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© European Association for Potato Research 2014

Authors and Affiliations

  • D. Douches
    • 1
  • C. N. Hirsch
    • 2
  • N. C. Manrique-Carpintero
    • 1
  • A. N. Massa
    • 1
  • J. Coombs
    • 1
  • M. Hardigan
    • 3
  • D. Bisognin
    • 1
  • W. De Jong
    • 4
  • C. R. Buell
    • 3
  1. 1.Department of Plant, Soil and Microbial SciencesMichigan State UniversityEast LansingUSA
  2. 2.Department of Agronomy and Plant GeneticsUniversity of MinnesotaSaint PaulUSA
  3. 3.Department of Plant BiologyMichigan State UniversityEast LansingUSA
  4. 4.School of Integrative Plant ScienceCornell UniversityIthacaUSA

Personalised recommendations