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TechTrends

, Volume 62, Issue 4, pp 329–335 | Cite as

A Typology for Conducting Research in Culture, Learning and Technology

  • Angela D. BensonEmail author
Original Paper

Abstract

This article provides answers to two often-asked questions: 1) What is culture, learning and technology? and 2) What constitutes research in culture, learning, and technology? In doing so, it presents a typology for research in culture, learning, and technology (CLT) that can be used to organize the CLT research literature and guide future CLT research. The typology highlights the categories of frameworks used in CLT research and makes clear that one of the purposes of all CLT research is to identify methods and processes for ethical and inclusive practice.

Keywords

Frameworks Culture, learning and technology Culture Learning Technology Research CLT Ethical Inclusive 

Notes

Compliance with Ethical Standards

Human and Animal Studies

This article does not contain any studies with human participants or animals performed by any of the authors.

Conflict of Interest

Author Angela D. Benson declares that she has no conflict of interest.

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Copyright information

© Association for Educational Communications & Technology 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of Educational Leadership, Policy, and Technology StudiesThe University of AlabamaTuscaloosaUSA

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