TechTrends

, Volume 58, Issue 5, pp 27–35 | Cite as

What is task-centered learning?

Article

Abstract

Many recent models of learning and instruction center learning on real-world tasks and problems to support knowledge application and transfer. Of the many different approaches to centering learning on real-world tasks and problems, one main area in recent literature attempts to balance the efficiency of adequate learner support with the effectiveness of centering learning on real-world tasks. Names for the various models in this area have included problem-centered instruction, cognitive apprenticeship, elaboration theory, and taskcentered learning/instruction. As yet there has not been much comparison or combination of the prescriptions of these task-centered approaches to learning. Therefore we compare and combine several task-centered learning models to outline essential prescriptive elements of a task-centered learning approach.

Keywords

Task-centered Learning Instruction Problem-centered 

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Copyright information

© Association for Educational Communications and Technology 2014

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Northern State UniversityAberdeenUSA
  2. 2.Franklin UniversityColumbusUSA

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