TechTrends

, Volume 54, Issue 5, pp 69–75 | Cite as

A Student’s Guide to Strengthening an Online Community

  • Richard E. West
Article

Abstract

Students usually have plenty of experience with online social technologies, but they lack understanding about how to use these tools and methods for course learning. This article is designed to help college students who are anxious about participating in an online learning community or do not know how to build one effectively. With ideas derived from research and practice, this guide has been written to inform online students about learning communities, the benefits they offer, and how students can assist in building a successful online community.

Keywords

online learning community online learning community of practice CSCL computer-supported collaborative learning self-regulation netiquette social learning 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, Inc. 2010

Authors and Affiliations

  • Richard E. West

There are no affiliations available

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