TechTrends

, Volume 54, Issue 1, pp 38–46

Labels DO Matter! A Critique of AECT’s Redefinition of the Field

  • Patrick Lowenthal
  • Brent G. Wilson
Article

Abstract

AECT has recently (yet again!) redefined our field, reverting back to the use of the term educational technology. We believe this recent change is problematic for a number of reasons, but primarily because of the weak rationale offered for the change. This change affects how external audiences view our profession and is likely to confuse practitioners in corporate and higher education settings in particular. We offer a review of job postings, program titles, and listserv discussions to support our case. The labels we use to define ourselves are critically important - and we hope to see a stronger case made for changes for our foundational definitions in the future.

Keywords

Definitions Redefinition of Field Labels Language and Identity Branding Practitioner Perspectives 

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. Barbour, M. K. (2008, April 11). Re: Comparative Value of IT Programs [Electronic mailing list message]. Retrieved from http://www.listserv.uga.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A2=ind0804&L=itforum&P=R19316&X=33156D36571B496677&Y=patrick.lowenthal@ucdenver.edu
  2. Bourdieu, P. (1970). Reproduction in education, society, and culture. London: Sage Publications.Google Scholar
  3. Bruner, J. (1986). Actual minds, possible worlds. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press.Google Scholar
  4. Bruner, J. (1990). Acts of meaning. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press.Google Scholar
  5. Bruner, J. (2002). Making stories: Law, literature, life. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press.Google Scholar
  6. DeFrias, K. (2007, May 14). RE: What’s in a name? [Electronic mailing list message]. Retrieved from http://www.listserv.uga.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A2=ind0705&L=itforum&P=R7610&X=05A6BF4AE0823B9430&Y=patrick.lowenthal@ucdenver.edu
  7. Ely, D. P. (1989). Trends & issues in educational technology. Syracuse , NY: E R I C Clearinghouse on Information & TechnologyGoogle Scholar
  8. Ely, D. P., & Plomp, T. (2001). Classic writings on instructional technology (Vol. 2). Englewood, CO: Libraries Unlimited.Google Scholar
  9. Ferrell, B. (2004, April 2). Re: Definition of the profession [Electronic mailing list message]. Retrieved from http://www.listserv.uga.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A2=ind0404&L=itforum&P=R2413&X=2F13170A162C6D53EC&Y=patrick.lowenthal@ucdenver.edu
  10. Gee, J. P. (1996). Social linguistics and literacies: Ideology in discourses (2nd ed.). New York: Routledge Falmer.Google Scholar
  11. Gee, J. (2000). The new literacy studies: From ‘socially situated’ to the work of the social. In D. Barton, M. Hamilton & R. Ivanic (Eds.), Situated literacies: Reading and writing in context (pp. 180-196). New York: Routledge.Google Scholar
  12. Gee, J. (2002). Literacies, identities, and discourses. In M. J. Schleppegrell & M. C. Colombi (Eds.), Developing advanced literacy in first and second languages: Meaning with power (pp. 159-175). Mahwah, NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum Associates.Google Scholar
  13. Gee, J. P. (2003). What video games have to teach us about learning and literacy. New York: Palgrave Macmillan.Google Scholar
  14. Gentry, C. G. (1995). Educational technology: A question of meaning. In G. J. Anglin (Ed.) Instructional technology: Past, present, and future (2nd ed.; pp. 1-10). Westport, CT: Libraries UnlimitedGoogle Scholar
  15. Heinich, R. M. (1984). The proper study of instructional technology. Educational Communication and Technology Journal, 32(3), 67-87.Google Scholar
  16. Januszewski, A., & Molenda, M. (2008). Educational technology: A definition with commentary. Mahwah, NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum Associates.Google Scholar
  17. Lakoff, G. (1987). Women, fire, and dangerous things: What categories reveal about the mind. Chicago: University of Chicago Press.Google Scholar
  18. Lakoff, G., & Johnson, M. (1980). Metaphors we live by. Chicago: University of Chicago Press.Google Scholar
  19. Left, P. (1998, January 22). Re: IT [Electronic mailing list message]. Retrieved from http://www.listserv.uga.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A2=ind9801&L=itforum&P=R4093&X=4EF3E15AD4576EE440&Y=patrick.lowenthal@ucdenver.edu
  20. Molenda, M. (1997). Historical and philosophical foundations of instructional design: A North American view. In R. D. Tennyson, F. Schott, N. M. Seel, & S. Dijkstra (Eds.), Instructional design: International perspectives (vol. 1; pp. 41-54).Google Scholar
  21. Molenda, M. (2005). Association for Educational Communications and Technology in the 20th century: A brief history. Retrieved from http://www.aect.org/About/History/
  22. Morgan, R. M. (1978). Educational technology—Adolescence to adulthood. Educational Communication and Technology Journal, 26(2), 142-152.Google Scholar
  23. Ong, W. (1982). Orality and literacy: The technologizing of the word. New York: Routledge.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  24. Persichitte, K. A. (2008). Implications for academic programs. In A. Januszewski & M. Molenda, Educational technology: A definition with commentary (pp. 327-339). Mahwah, NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum Associates.Google Scholar
  25. Quinn, C. (2007, May 14). RE: What’s in a name? [Electronic mailing list message]. Retrieved from http://www.listserv.uga.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A2=ind0705&L=itforum&P=R7760&X=05A6BF4AE0823B9430&Y=patrick.lowenthal@ucdenver.edu
  26. Reigeluth, C. M. (1989). Educational technology at the crossroads: New mindsets and new directions. Educational Technology Research and Development, 37(1), 67-80.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  27. Reigeluth, C. M., & Carr-Chellman, A. (2006). A Common Language and Knowledge Base for ID? Retrieved from http://it.coe.uga.edu/itforum/paper91/Paper91.html
  28. Reiser, R. A. (1987). Instructional technology: A history. In R. M. Gagne (Ed.), Instructional technology: Foundations (pp. 11-48). Hillsdale, NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum Associates.Google Scholar
  29. Reiser, R. A. (2007). What field did you say you were in? Defining and naming our field. In R. A. Reiser & J. V. Dempsey (Eds.), Trends and issues in instructional design and technology (2nd ed., pp. 2-9). Upper Saddle River, NJ: Pearson.Google Scholar
  30. Seels, B. B., & Richey, R. C. (1994). Instructional technology: The definition of the field. Washington, DC: Association for Educational Communications and Technology.Google Scholar
  31. Shewanown, S. (2004, March 25). Re: ID&T to Performance Technology [Electronic mailing list message]. Retrieved from http://www.listserv.uga.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A2=ind0403&L=itforum&P=R31534&X=2935B237B9755F19C8&Y=patrick.lowenthal@ucdenver.edu
  32. Spencer, H. E. (2004, March 25). Re: ID&T to Performance Technology [Electronic mailing list message]. Retrieved from http://www.listserv.uga.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A2=ind0403&L=itforum&P=R31375&X=67C3351B28A7466232&Y=patrick.lowenthal@ucdenver.edu
  33. Torkelson, G. M. (1998). A history of AECT from a personal perspective. TechTrends, 43(1), 47-50.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  34. Wenger, E. (1999). Communities of practice: Learning, meaning, and identity. New York: Cambridge University Press.Google Scholar
  35. Wertsch, J. V. (1991). Voices of the mind: A sociocultural approach to mediated action. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press.Google Scholar
  36. White, J., & Lowenthal, P. R. (2009, Spring). The cyclical rhetoric of educational reform: Forgetting history’s lessons. eJournal of Education Policy Google Scholar
  37. Wilson, B. G. (2005). Foundations of instructional design: Reclaiming the conversation. In J. M.Spector, C. Ohrazda, A. Van Schaack, & D. A. Wiley (Eds.), Innovations in instructional technology (pp. 237-252). Mahwah, NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum Associates.Google Scholar
  38. Vygotsky, L. (1962). Thought and language. Cambridge, MA: MIT Press.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  39. Vygotsky, L. (1978). Mind in society: The development of higher psychological processes. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, Inc. 2009

Authors and Affiliations

  • Patrick Lowenthal
  • Brent G. Wilson

There are no affiliations available

Personalised recommendations