TechTrends

, Volume 50, Issue 2, pp 20–26

Foundations for Systemic Change

Societal Evolution and the Need for Systemic Change in Education
  • Jerrold E. Kemp
  • Sunnie Lee
  • Daniel Pascoe
  • Brian Beabout
  • William Watson
  • Stephanie Moore
Section 2

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Author Information and References for Section 2

Societal Evolution and the Need for Systemic Change in Education

  1. Jerrold E. Kemp is Professor Emeritus of the Department of Instructional Technology at San Jose State University, president of AECT's Division for Systemic Change, and past president of AECT. He is the author of texts on instructional systems design and designing instruction in the 21st Century.Google Scholar
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The Learner-Centered Paradigm of Instruction and Training

  1. Sunnie Lee is an associate instructor and doctoral student in the Instructional Systems Technology Department at Indiana University, Bloomington. Her research focus lies in systemic change, the learner-centered paradigm of instruction, and technology integration in K-12. She is currently serving as a board member for the Systemic Change Division of AECT. She can be contacted at suklee@indiana.edu.Google Scholar
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What is Systems Theory?

  1. Daniel Pascoe, M Div, is Associate Director of the Indiana University Career Development Center. He is also a doctoral student in the Instructional Systems Technology Department at Indiana University, Bloomington. His research interests include systems theory and career development. He can be contacted at dpascoe@indiana.edu.Google Scholar
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Systems Thinking for AECT Members

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Systemic Change and Systems Design

  1. William Watson is a lecturer in Computer and Information Technology at Indiana University - Purdue University Indianapolis and a doctoral student in the Instructional Systems Technology Department at Indiana University, Bloomington. His research interests include the design of instructional video games, e-learning, and systemic change in education. He can be contacted at wwatson@iupui.edu.Google Scholar
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Systemic Change as an Anchor Point for Professional Ethics and Action

  1. Stephanie Moore, Ph.D., is currently the Assessment Coordinator for Colorado Reading First at the Colorado Department of Education in Denver, CO. Her research interests include professional ethics in educational technology, history and philosophy of technology, systemic assessment and evaluation, systemic change and related issues. She can be contacted at stephanie@hyperformer.com.Google Scholar
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Copyright information

© Springer Science + Business Media, Inc. 2006

Authors and Affiliations

  • Jerrold E. Kemp
  • Sunnie Lee
  • Daniel Pascoe
  • Brian Beabout
  • William Watson
  • Stephanie Moore

There are no affiliations available

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